Entries Tagged as 'Windows'

Desktop Sharing

Maybe I’ve become spoiled, but I just expect desktop sharing (remote control) to be easy and fast.

Nothing, absolutely nothing compares to Microsoft’s RDP; and virtually any Windows machine (except home editions) can be accessed remotely via RDP; and all Windows machines and Macs can access a remote Windows machine.

Apple has their own Remote Desktop Client, and it works well — but it’s far from free (OUCH, far from free).  And Apple does build in VNC into OS-X (can you say dismally slow)… but they don’t provide any Windows client.

Linux and other *nix operating system you can use an X session remotely; or VNC (zzzzzzzzzzzzz again, slow).

As a “universal” desktop sharing solution VNC isn’t horrible (and it’s certainly priced right, and there’s plenty of different ports and builds of it to choose from), but it’s old school and old technology.

I personally think it would be a great standard to have an efficient remote desktop sharing standard, that all computers (and PDAs) could use… one ring — eh, got carried away there; one client could talk to any server, and operating system vendors would only need optimize their server and their client, other operating system vendors would do the same…

Originally posted 2009-02-23 01:00:41.

XenSever

When Citrix purchased the rights to XenServer™ they heated up the battle on the virtualization front by legitimizing (and commercializing) virtualization technology based on an open source code base.  Then they added enterprise capabilities to manager a virtualization farm and went head-to-head with VMware; they they struck an alliance with Microsoft to support Hyper-V based technology as well (and Microsoft added support for Xen based technology to their product).

Now Citrix has fired a new volley by making XenServer as well as XenMotion and XenCenter absolutely free.

These aren’t scaled down versions of the product; Citrix has adopted the model to sell support and maintenance contracts to enterprise customers as well as a few add on products.

XenServer was already a good value for enterprise virtualization, now it’s an incredible value for enterprise virtualzation as well as small business and even pro-sumer (home users who want or need more than simple desktop virtualization).

At minimum, any company looking at moving to or enhancing their virtualization platform would be totally irresponsible if they didn’t consider evaluating a product like XenServer before making a decision (and it’s very likely that they’ll find XenServer the most economical solutions since it includes essential components that would add considerably to the costs of a Microsoft or VMware solution).

xensource.com

Originally posted 2010-05-02 02:00:52.

DVD Backup

Before using software the backs up encrypted media please check the laws in your country and insure that you are in full compliance.  In some countries there may be conflicting laws, make sure you understand the issues before proceding.

DVDDecrypter was one of the absolute best utilities for decrypting DVDs for legitimate backup purposes; you can still find copies of it on the internet, and you can read all about it and the end of it’s development.

Now DVDFab is probably the best product for Windows.  Three’s a free version, as well as two different commercial versions of it for sale by the developers.

Originally posted 2008-11-30 12:00:51.

NetBeans for C/C++ on Windows

 

I’ve been a fan of the NetBeans environment for developing for a long time.  Yes, there’s a great deal of resistance to it because it’s not OpenSource (it’s an Oracle sponsored project), but it’s free for Windows, OS-X, and Linux.

Many think NetBeans is only an IDE for Java development.  That’s definitely not the case.  NetBeans will do Java, HTML5, C/C++, Fortan, Groovy, PHP, and many more (with plug-ins)… and works with both Tomcat and GlassFish (GlassFish is actually bundled with several NetBeans packages — but you do not have to install it if you’re not going to use it).

NetBeans is written in Java, and you need not only a JRE (runtime), but also a JDK (development kit)… on Java.com (also an Oracle project — they purchased Sun) you can download bundles for many operating systems including JRE, JDK, and NetBeans (you can also install them individually).

Getting NetBeans and C/C++ to work on Linux is a snap, you just need your development tools setup before you install / run NetBeans.  I’d considered install on Windows pretty straight forward as well, but since I’ve helped two different people get it working in the last week, and several a few months ago I’m going to write a quick list of the steps involved.


 

While not all of these steps need to be done in the order I’m listing them in, unless you really know what you’re doing (and why would you be reading this if you already know how to make this work), just follow the steps.  If you have any problems getting this to work, use my contact page — I definitely want to improve my instructions (no — I’m not going to put screen shots and make it a guide for people who’ve never seen a computer before… it’s a development environment, so I’m working on the premise you either know C/C++ or you’re taking a class in it).

At the end of the article are some links that might help (please search the internet if the links are broken).

  1. Download and install the latest JRE (or the one you’ve been told to if taking a class).
  2. Download and install the latest JDK (or the one you’ve been told to / matches the JRE).
  3. Download and install the latest NetBeans full package (it’s the right most column, if you’re worried about disk space, don’t install GlassFish).
  4. Download and install MinGW in C:\MinGW
  5. Run the mingw-get-setup.exe file and select the C++ compiler, development environment, MSYS
    base (we’ll install the rest in the next step).
  6. Download and install MSYS into C:\MinGW\msys\1.0 (watch the navigation pane to insure you don’t get an extra 1.0 in the path).  Let the install “normalize” (that’ll remove duplicate copies of tools.
  7. Add the following to the Windows path (you will need admin rights — if you don’t have admin rights then you’ll have to launch NetBeans through a batch file that adds them to the windows path before executing NetBeans).
    • c:\MinGW\bin
    • c:\MinGW\MSys\1.0\bin
  • Launch NetBeans and do the following:
    • tools->plugins
      insure C++ is installed/enabled
    • tools->preferences->C++
      if necessary add the MinGW toolchain and accept defauls (NetBeans should locate all the required components).
  • Now just create a “Hello World” project and insure that it works.

 


 

Originally posted 2015-02-07 15:00:29.

Virtual Server 2005 R2 with Internet Explorer 8

You’ve probably read my rant on IE8 and how broken it is.

If you have IE8, and you need to use Virtual Server 2005 R2 (and perhaps previous versions as well), and you’re tired of having to select compatibility mode manually all the time…

You can add a customer header to your web site to force IE8 into IE7 (compatibility) mode.

However, on a workstation (XP, Vista, etc) that means all of your web sites will force IE8 into IE7 mode; on a server (Server 2003, Server 2008, etc) you can set the header on only the virtual server web site.

Why Microsoft doesn’t issue a hot fix for this is totally beyond me… seem like it would be trivial for them to make the web service app send the META tag; or they could actually address the compatibility issues.

On Vista you’ll find the menu you need via:

  • Computer->Manage->Services and Applications->Internet Information Server->HTTP Response Headers->Add

And the Custom HTTP Response Header you’ll set and value is:

  • Name:  X-UA-Compatible
  • Value: IE=EmulateIE7

On other versions of Windows you just need to get to the IIS management console figure out how to set the custom HTTP header on a site (remember, workstation versions of Windows only have one web site so depending on the version of  Windows you’ll see either ‘default’ or nothing listed).

Originally posted 2009-08-27 01:00:02.

PDF Creation

PDF (Portable Document Format) was developed by Adobe Systems in 1994 but as of July 1, 2008 it’s an open standard (ISO 32000-1:2008) and there are a host of tools, many free, that allow you to create, view, and work with PDFs.

If you need to create PDFs on your Windows machine from various applications consider Bullzip.  It installs a printer (uses GhostScript lite — it will install it for you if you don’t already have GhostScript) that allows you to “print” to PDF.  It’s totally free, and totally worth it.

For more advanced PDF manipulation, you can learn how to use GhostScript or try out the PDF Took Kit (Pdftk) form AccessPDF.

You’re probably better off to do an internet search on GhostScript, but here’s where you can find links to information and downloads.

Originally posted 2008-11-25 12:00:47.

Microsoft Security Essentials

A few years ago Microsoft® provided a free Beta of it’s Anti-Virus solution; and Beta users were provided with one free license to continue to use the “One Care” branded Anti-Virus.

Now (as of 29 September 2009 – yesterday) Microsoft is once again providing a free Anti-Virus for “genuine” Windows.

Personally I use Avast’s free version; I’d consider using the Microsoft AV on servers, but the free version only support desktop versions of Windows (like Avast).

http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/

Originally posted 2009-09-30 01:00:29.

System Update Readiness Tool for Windows

If you have any issue installing Windows V6 SP2 or an update for Vista or Server 2008 you might want to download and run the System Update Readiness Tool from Microsoft.

You can read about it and download it via the link below.

 

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/947821

Originally posted 2009-06-08 11:00:04.

Customizing Windows XP and Vista Installations

Two tools you should know about are nLite (for XP/2003) and vLite (for Vista/2008), they allow you to customize the installation of Windows as well as “slip stream” in service packs, hot fixes, drivers, etc.

On interesting note, you can often build a slip streamed installation media and install from it faster than you can install, apply drivers and service packs!

It’s easy to use and can save a great deal of time and it’s free.

Originally posted 2008-12-03 12:00:06.

Windows XP, You Just Can’t Kill It!

Yesterday Microsoft made some significant changes to the order policies for Windows XP; while they did not extend the January 31, 2009 cut-off date for ordering licenses for Windows XP, they are allowing distributors to schedule delivery for their final orders over time — until 30 May, 2009.  More importantly, distributors will not have to pay for the licenses until they take possession of them.

There’s no way of telling if Microsoft will further extend Windows XP availability, they’ve already extended availability to larger computer manufacturers and OEMs by six months (until 31 July, 2009); and Microsoft has allowed the sale of Windows XP on low-end notebooks until 30 June, 2010.

Currently Windows XP “outsells” Windows Vista about 3-to-1 so it’s obvious that Microsoft isn’t convinced they can maintain the current sales volume by forcing Windows Vista onto consumers and businesses.

Vista may well become a collector’s items — and maybe earn the nick-name of the Windows that never was…

Originally posted 2008-12-23 12:00:36.