Entries Tagged as 'Email'

1and1 POP / IMAP / SMTP Settings

If you have a 1and1 hosted domain with email (like my domains are), you can use the following settings for your email client:

POP:

host: pop.1and1.com
port: 110
port: 995, SSL

IMAP:

host: imap.1and1.com
port: 143
port: 993, SSL

SMTP:

host: smtp.1and1.com (requires authentication)
port: 25
port: 587, SSL

You can access 1and1 web mail via:

http://webmail.1and1.com/

Originally posted 2008-05-19 14:26:41.

hMailServer

If you’re interested in running a fairly full featured mail server on Windows, take a look at hMailServer — it’s completely free and through version 4 Open Source.

I have a patch to V4.4.2-B279 and V4.4.2-B283 that allows you to set the directory separator for IMAP folders (by default it will use “.” — and for many people that’s not a good choice).

To get it working:

  • Download the source.
  • Download the patch.
  • Un-archive the patch
  • Apply the patch (easy to do with SVN)
  • Setup a build environment (Microsoft VS2005, Microsoft VB6, Inno Setup v5, CollabNet SVN [optional]).
  • Run the build tool (you may need to make some changes to it’s configuration).
  • Install the resulting package.
  • Edit the INI file and change the FolderSeparator to “/” or “\” (I would not advise using other characters)
  • Restart the service.

It only took me a couple hours to modify and test the code; other than installing the environment to build it (and I recommend you do that on a virtual machine since these are older tools) it should take you substantially less time.

Some notes:

  • The changes to the build configuration are not necessary; you will need to make the appropriate changes for your build environment so I would say don’t apply them.
  • The changes to the HIS_DBWrappers is because you do not need to (and in many cases it will fail) register the built DLL on your build machine; it will be packaged in the install file and registered on installation (you would only need it registered if you wanted to debug, and I recommend building, installing, and then attaching to the running process so you need not worry about configuration issues if you want to debug).
  • This is Open Source software, and it’s not MY software — I don’t make any claims about it or warrant it in any way.  It’s your responsibility to test it.  While I’m certainly interested in anything you find, I’m in no way responsible.

I have a couple more modifications I’m considering (both of which will require much more work):

  • Changing the way folders and sub-folders are stored so that the folders appear in the file system in directories that match the folder names (and removing the limits on depth and number).
  • Potentially adding a ‘search’ feature that’s integrated with WDS to quickly find messages.  Since IMAP will only search within a folder, I’m thinking about adding a special folder called “Search” and any folder created in it will actually be the search term and the results displayed will be dynamic based on WDS output. 

In case you’re wondering, I don’t really care about hMailServer as an end-point mail server; I care about to manage my IMAP message store.  I have nearly 40GB of mail, nearly 50,000 folders, and WAY too many messages store on a server with 16 spindles in a RAID5 configuration.  So my “interest” doesn’t align closely with most users.

This is only the patch file; you must download the source from here.

These are patches produced from the specific versions listed, but they can (most likely) be applied to any v4.4.2 build fairly recent).

Originally posted 2008-11-09 08:00:38.

Internet Service Provider Mail Servers

This is a listing of server names for various internet service providers and hosting companies I’ve complied.  Use your browser (page text) search feature to locate the one you’re interested or browse them alphabetically (this is a lengthy post).

1&1

  • pop3:  pop.1and1.com
    port 110; 995 ssl
  • imap4: imap.1and1.com
    port 143; 993 ssl
  • smtp: smtp.1and1.com
    port 25; 587 ssl

Adelphia Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.adelphia.net
  • smtp: mail.adelphia.net

AT&T Internet Service

  • pop3: postoffice.worldnet.att.net
  • smtp: mailhost.worldnet.att.net
  • nntp: netnews.att.net (dial)
  • nntp: netnews.worldnet.att.net (dial)
  • nntp: inetnews.worldnet.att.net (broadband

AOL Internet Service

  • imap4: imap.aol.com
  • smtp: smtp.aol.com

Bell Altantic Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.bellatlantic.net
  • smtp: gtei.bellatlantic.net

BellSouth Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.bellsouth.net
  • smtp: mail.bellsouth.net
  • nntp: newsgroups.bellsouth.net

BlueLight Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.bluelight.net
  • smtp: mail.bluelight.net

Brainstorm Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.gobrainstorm.net
  • smtp: mail.gobrainstorm.net

Cableone Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.cableone.net
  • smtp: authmail.cableone.net

Charter Communications

  • pop3: pop.charter.net
  • smtp: smtp.charter.net

Comcast Communications

  • pop3: mail.comcast.net
  • smtp: smtp.comcast.net
  • nntp: newsgroups.comcast.net

Compaq Internet Service

  • pop3: pop3.compaq.net
  • smtp: smtp.compaq.net
  • nntp: news.compaq.net

Compuserve Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.compuserve.com
  • smtp: smtp.compuserve.com
  • nntp: news.compuserve.com

Concentric Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.concentric.net
  • smtp: smtp.concentric.net
  • nntp: news.concentric.net

Cox Communications

  • East
    • pop3: pop.east.cox.net
    • smtp: smtp.east.cox.net
    • nntp: news.east.cox.net
  • Central
    • pop3: pop.central.cox.net
    • smtp: smtp.central.cox.net
    • nntp: newscentral.cox.net
  • West
    • pop3: pop.west.cox.net
    • smtp: smtp.west.cox.net
    • nntp: news.west.cox.net

Cypress Communications

  • pop3: pop.cypress communications.net
  • smtp: smtp.cypress communications.net

DirectNIC Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.directnic.com
  • smtp: smtp.directnic.com

Dotster

  • pop3: pop.registerapi.com
  • smtp: smtpauth.registerapi.com

Earthlink Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.earthlink.net
  • smtp: ssmtpauth.earthlink.net
  • nntp: news.east.earthlink.net
  • nntp: news.west.earthlink.net
  • ftp: ftp-www.earthlink.net

EasyCGI

  • pop3: mail.[yourdomain]
  • smtp: smtp.[yourdomain]

FrontierNet Internet Service

  • pop3: pop3.frontiernet.net
  • smtp: smtp.frontiernet.net
  • nntp: news.frontiernet.net

GoDaddy

  • pop3: mail.godaddy.com
  • smtp: [none]

Google Mail

  • pop3: pop.gmail.com
    port 995 ssl
  • imap4: imap.gmail.com
    port 993 ssl
  • smtp: smtp.gmail.com
    port 465, 587 ssl/starttls

HughesNet Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.hughes.net
  • smtp: smtp.hughes.net

Internet America Internet Service

  • pop3: pop3.airmail.net
  • smtp: mail.airmail.net

iPage

  • pop3: mail.[yourdomain]
  • smtp: mail.[yourdomain]

IX Web Hosting

  • pop3: pop.ix.netcom.com
  • smtp: smtp.ix.netcom.com

Juno Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.juno.com
  • smtp: smtp.juno.com

JustHost

  • pop3: mail.[yourdomain] port 110; 995 ssl
  • imap4: mail.[yourdomain] port 143; 993 ssl
  • smtp: mail.[yourdomain] port 25, 2626; 465, 587 ssl

Lycos

  • pop3: pop.mail.lycos.com
  • smtp: smtp.mail.lycos.com

Mac

  • pop3: mail.mac.com
  • smtp: smtp.mac.com

Mail.com

  • pop3: pop1.mail.com
  • smtp: smtp1.mail.com
  • nntp: news.mail.com

MegaPath Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.megapathdsl.net
  • smtp: mail.megapathdsl.net
  • nntp: news.megapath.net

Mediacom Online Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.mchsi.com
  • smtp: mail.mchsi.com
  • nntp: netnews.mchsi.com

Mindspring Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.mindspring.com
  • smtp: smtp.mindspring.com

Mpower Communications

  • pop3: pop.mpowercom.net
  • smtp: smtp.mpowercom.net
  • nntp: news.mpowercom.net

MSN Internet Service Provider

  • pop3: pop3.email.msn.com
  • smtp: smtp.email.msn.com
  • nntp: netnews.msn.com

Netscape

  • pop3: pop3.isp.netscape.com
  • smtp: smtp.isp.netscape.com
  • nntp: news.netscape.com

Network Solutions

  • pop3: mail.[yourdomain]
  • smtp: smtp.[yourdomain]

NetZero Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.netzero.net
  • smtp: smtp.netzero.net
  • nntp: news.netzero.net

onehost worx Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.emailworx.net
  • smtp: smtpsecure.emailworx.net

Pacifier Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.pacifier.com
  • smtp: smtp.pacifier.com

PeoplePC Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.peoplepc.com
  • smtp: smtpauth.peoplepc.com
  • nntp: news.peoplepc.com

Pipeline Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.pipeline.com
  • smtp: smtp.pipeline.com

Rediff Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.rediffmailpro.com
  • smtp: smtp.rediffmailpro.com
  • nntp: news.rediff.com

SBC Yahoo!

  • Ameritech
    • pop3: pop.ameritech.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.ameritech.yahoo.com
  • NVBell
    • pop3: pop.nvbell.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.nvbell.yahoo.com
  • PacBell
    • pop3: pop.pacbell.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.pacbell.yahoo.com
  • SNet
    • pop3: pop.snet.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.snet.yahoo.com
  • SWBell
    • pop3: pop.swbell.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.swbell.yahoo.com

  • Flash
    • pop3: pop.flash.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.flash.yahoo.com
  • Prodigy
    • pop3: pop.sbcglobal.net
    • smtp: smtpauth.prodigy.net
  • Wans
    • pop3: pop.wans.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.wans.yahoo.com
  • – Other –
    • pop3: pop.sbcglobal.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.sbcglobal.yahoo.com

Seanet Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.seanet.com
  • smtp: mx.seanet.com
  • nntp: news.seanet.com

Sonic.net Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.sonic.net
  • smtp: mail.sonic.net
  • nntp: news.sonic.net

Speakeasy Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.speakeasy.net
  • smtp: mail.speakeasy.net
  • nntp: news.speakeasy.net

SprintPCS

  • pop3: pop.sprintpcs.com
  • smtp: smtp.sprintpcs.com

Sprynet Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.sprynet.com
  • smtp: smtp.sprynet.com

Starpower Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.starpower.net
  • smtp: smtp.starpower.net
  • nntp: news.starpower.net

Time Warner

  • Alabama (Birmingham)
    • pop3: pop-server.bham.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.bham.rr.com
  • Alabama (Dothan)
    • pop3: pop-server.sw.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sw.rr.com
  • Alabama (Eufaula)
    • pop3: pop-server.eufaula.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.eufaula.rr.com
  • California (Bakersfield)
    • pop3: pop-server.bak.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.bak.rr.com
  • California (San Diego)
    • pop3: pop-server.san.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.san.rr.com
  • California (Southern / Los Angeles)
    • pop3: pop-server.socal.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.socal.rr.com
  • California (Desert Cities)
    • pop3: pop-server.dc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.dc.rr.com
  • Florida (Cantonment)
    • pop3: pop-server.panhandle.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.panhandle.rr.com
  • Florida (Central Florida, Orlando)
    • pop3: pop-server.clf.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.clf.rr.com
  • Florida (Cape Coral / Naples)
    • pop3: pop-server.swfla.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.swfla.rr.com
  • Florida (Lake City / Live Oak)
    • pop3: pop-server.se.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.se.rr.com
  • Florida (Palatka)
    • pop3: pop-server.se.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.se.rr.com
  • Florida (St Augustine)
    • pop3: pop-server.se.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.se.rr.com
  • Florida (Tampa Bay)
    • pop3: pop-server.tampabay.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.tampabay.rr.com
  • Georgia (Ft. Benning)
    • pop3: pop-server.sw.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sw.rr.com
  • Indiana (Indianapolis)
    • pop3: pop-server.indy.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.indy.rr.com
  • Indiana (Terre Haute)
    • pop3: pop-server.ma.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ma.rr.com
  • Kansas (Kansas City)
    • pop3: pop-server.kc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.kc.rr.com
  • Kansas (Colby)
    • pop3: pop-server.we.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.we.rr.com
  • Louisiana (Houma)
    • pop3: pop-server.sw.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sw.rr.com
  • Louisiana (La Place)
    • pop3: pop-server.sw.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sw.rr.com
  • Louisiana (Monroe)
    • pop3: pop-server.jam.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.jam.rr.com
  • Louisiana (Shreveport)
    • pop3: pop-server.sport.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sport.rr.com
  • Maine (Southeast Maine, Portland)
    • pop3: pop-server.maine.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.maine.rr.com
  • Massachusettes (Athol)
    • pop3: pop-server.mass.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.mass.rr.com
  • Massachusettes (Berkshire County)
    • pop3: pop-server.berkshire.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.berkshire.rr.com
  • Michigan (Detroit)
    • pop3: pop-server.twmi.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.twmi.rr.com
  • Minnesota (Minneapolis)
    • pop3: pop-server.mn.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.mn.rr.com
  • Mississippi (Jackson)
    • pop3: pop-server.jam.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.jam.rr.com
  • Missouri (Kansas City)
    • pop3: pop-server.kc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.kc.rr.com
  • Nebraska (Lincoln)
    • pop3: pop-server.neb.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.neb.rr.com
  • New Hampshire (Keene)
    • pop3: pop-server.ne.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ne.rr.com
  • New Jersey (Bergen)
    • pop3: pop-server.nj.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.nj.rr.com
  • New York (Albany)
    • pop3: pop-server.nycap.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.nycap.rr.com
  • New York (Central Northern)
    • pop3: pop-server.twcny.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.twcny.rr.com
  • New York (Hudson Valley, Catskills)
    • pop3: pop-server.hvc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.hvc.rr.com
  • New York (New York City, Manhattan)
    • pop3: pop-server.nyc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.nyc.rr.com
  • New York (Rochester)
    • pop3: pop-server.rochester.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.rochester.rr.com
  • New York (Binghamton, Vestal, Johnson City)
    • pop3: pop-server.stny.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.stny.rr.com
  • New York (Staten Island)
    • pop3: pop-server.si.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.si.rr.com
  • North Carolina (Raleigh, Durham, RTP)
    • pop3: pop-server.nc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.nc.rr.com
  • North Carolina (East Carolina, Wilmington)
    • pop3: pop-server.ec.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ec.rr.com
  • North Carolina (Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High-Point)
    • pop3: pop-server.triad.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.triad.rr.com
  • North Carolina (Charlotte Metro)
    • pop3: pop-server.carolina.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.carolina.rr.com
  • Ohio (Cincinatti)
    • pop3: pop-server.cinci.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.cinci.rr.com
  • Ohio (Columbus)
    • pop3: pop-server.columbus.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.columbus.rr.com
  • Ohio (North East)
    • pop3: pop-server.neo.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.neo.rr.com
  • Ohio (Western)
    • pop3: pop-server.woh.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.woh.rr.com
  • Pennsylvania (Erie)
    • pop3: pop-server.ma.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ma.rr.com
  • Pennsylvania (Philadelphia)
    • pop3: pop-server.ucwphilly.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ucwphilly.rr.com
  • South Carolina (Columbia)
    • pop3: pop-server.carolina.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.carolina.rr.com
  • Tennessee (Memphis)
    • pop3: pop-server.midsouth.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.midsouth.rr.com
  • Texas (Austin)
    • pop3: pop-server.austin.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.austin.rr.com
  • Texas (El Paso)
    • pop3: pop-server.elp.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.elp.rr.com
  • Texas (Houston)
    • pop3: pop-server.houston.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.houston.rr.com
  • Texas (Rio Grande Valley)
    • pop3: pop-server.rgv.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.rgv.rr.com
  • Texas (San Antonio)
    • pop3: pop-server.satx.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.satx.rr.com
  • Texas (Heart of Texax – Waco, Temple, etc.)
    • pop3: pop-server.hot.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.hot.rr.com
  • Texas (Greater Texas, Beaumont)
    • pop3: pop-server.gt.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.gt.rr.com
  • Texas (Corpus Christi, Eagle Pass, Kerrville, Laredo)
    • pop3: pop-server.stx.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.stx.rr.com
  • Texas (Witchita Falls)
    • pop3: pop-server.sw.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sw.rr.com
  • West Virginia (Clarksburg)
    • pop3: pop-server.ma.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ma.rr.com
  • Wisconsin (Milwaukee)
    • pop3: pop-server.wi.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.wi.rr.com
  • Wisconsin (North East Wisconsin, Green Bay)
    • pop3: pop-server.new.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.new.rr.com

Verizon Internet Service

  • pop3: incoming.verizon.net
  • smtp: outgoing.verizon.net
  • nntp: news.verizon.net

Verizon Wireless

  • pop3: pop.vzwmail.net
  • smtp: smtp.vzwmail.net

WildBlue Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.wildblue.net
  • smtp: mail.wildblue.net
  • nntp: news.wildblue.net

Windstream Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.windstream.net
  • smtp: smtp.windstream.net
  • nntp: news.windstream.net

Yahoo! Mail

  • pop3: pop.mail.yahoo.com
  • smtp: smtp.mail.yahoo.com
  • nntp: news.news.yahoo.com

Legend:

  • ftp: File Transfer Protocol
  • pop3: Post Office Protocol (incoming mail)
  • imap4: Internet Message Access Protocol (incoming mail)
  • nntp: Network News Transfer Protocol (news)
  • smtp: Simple Mail Transport Protocol (outgoing mail)

Notes:

Unfortunately, I cannot confirm the accuracy of most of this information; however, should you notice an error (or oversight) please contact me and I will correct it.

As I determine the encryption and ports for each provider I’ll add them as well.

Originally posted 2010-10-29 02:00:41.

One of the upsides of the internet…

One of the things that the internet allows almost everyone is the ability to express their opinion in a venue that others can “hear”.

Just do an internet search on almost anything you can think of… you’ll find reviews, comments, rants, and sometimes raves!

While you rarely know anything about the individual who wrote the posting, from a well thought out post you can gather some important questions to get the answers to before making a decision, so as a tool for an informed consumer the internet can be invaluable not only in locating the “best” prices, but also in finding the “best” products and “best” vendors!

It only takes a little effort to learn a great deal about any good or service you’re considering — it’s totally up to you whether you make an informed decision or just wing it.

Originally posted 2008-12-30 12:00:06.

Anti-Malware Programs

First, malware is a reality and no operating system is immune to it.

Malware is most common on operating systems that are prevalent (no reason to target 1% of the installed base now is there); so an obscure operating system is far less likely to be the target of malware.

Malware is most common on popular operating systems that generally do not require elevation of privileges to install (OS-X, *nix, Vista, and Server 2008 all require that a user elevate their privileges before installing software, even if they have rights to administer the machine).

The reality is that even a seasoned computer professional can be “tricked” into installing malware; and the only safe computer is a computer that’s disconnected from the rest the world and doesn’t have any way to get new software onto it (that would probably be a fairly useless computer).

Beyond exercising common sense, just not installing software you don’t need or are unsure of (remember, you can install and test software in a virtual machine using UNDO disks before you commit it to a real machine), and using a hardware “firewall” (residential gateway devices should be fine as long as you change the default password, disable WAN administration, and use WPA or WPA2 on your wireless network) between you and your high-speed internet connection; using anti-malware software is your best line of defense.

There are a lot of choices out there, but one of the best you’ll find is Avast! — there’s a free edition for non-commercial use, and of course several commercial version for workstations and servers.

My experience is that on all but the slowest computers Avast! performs well, and catches more malware than most any of the big-name commercial solutions.

For slower computers that you need mal-ware protection for, consider AVG (they also have a free version for non-commercial use); I don’t find it quite as good as Avast! at stopping as wide a range of threats, but it’s much lower on resource demands (and that helps to keep your legacy machine usable).

Originally posted 2009-01-02 12:00:01.

Google and Google Hosted POP, IMAP, and SMTP

Setting up Google and Google hosted domains for POP, IMAP, and SMTP access is fairly straight forward — but you need to start with a session by sign on to Google Mail.

Once you sign in, you can go to the Mail Settings

From there, select Fowarding and POP/IMAP

Then you just enable either POP and/or IMAP and click “Save Changes” at the bottom of the page.

Once you’ve done that, just use one of the following links for step-by-step instructions for configuring your client.

POP Configuration Instructions

IMAP Configuration Instructions

 


POP Settings

Incoming Mail (POP3) Server – requires SSL: pop.gmail.com
Use SSL: Yes
Port: 995
Outgoing Mail (SMTP) Server – requires TLS3 or SSL: smtp.gmail.com (use authentication)
Use Authentication: Yes
Port for TLS/STARTTLS: 587
Port for SSL: 465
Account Name: your full email address (including @gmail.com or @your_domain.com)
Email Address: your email address (username@gmail.com or username@your_domain.com)
Password: your Gmail password

 


IMAP Settings

Incoming Mail (IMAP) Server – requires SSL: imap.gmail.com
Use SSL: Yes
Port: 993
Outgoing Mail (SMTP) Server – requires TLS: smtp.gmail.com (use authentication)
Use Authentication: Yes
Use STARTTLS: Yes (some clients call this SSL)
Port: 465 or 587
Account Name: your full email address (including @gmail.com) Google Apps users, please enter username@your_domain.com
Email Address: your full Gmail email address (username@gmail.com) Google Apps users, please enter username@your_domain.com
Password: your Gmail password

Originally posted 2011-09-12 02:00:26.

Free EMail…

Right LOL

Most of you probably think that the free email provider you’re using makes money by showing you those annoying advertisements when you access you email via their web-mail interface.

Have you ever stopped to think about how they could possibly make money when they allow you to use a POP3 or IMAP4 client to read your email?

Well, the bottom line is sure they make some money by showing you those advertisements; but in this day and age almost every single email provider actually uses the content of your inbox to target you and sell demographic information.

While they might not be “reading” your email line-by-line; they are certainly indexing your email’s content — and they’re selling information about what you (aggregated of course) are talking about to anyone who will pay for it… and of course it’s long be rumored that some of them might have agreements with “men in black” to provide them more details about email (and searches) that might be consider a threat to national security.

Read the Terms of Service (TOS) for your “free” email provider very carefully — you’re going to be surprised what you’ve authorized them to do, and how little privacy you really have (remember some of the cable companies and DSL providers actually have you using one of those “big name” email providers as well — so your “for-pay” email account might be suspect as well).

My advice…

If you care about your privacy, pay a little money with an email provider that doesn’t harvest your personal (and confidential) information and sell it off to everyone with a little pocket change.

Originally posted 2009-08-19 01:00:36.

JustHost.com POP / IMAP / SMTP Settings

POP:
host: mail.<yourdomain>
host: <yourhost>.justhost.com
port: 110
port: 995, SSL

IMAP:
host: mail.<yourdomain>
host:<yourhost> .justhost.com
port: 143
port: 993, SSL

SMTP:
host: mail.<yourdomain> (requires authentication)
host: <yourhost>.justhost.com
port: 25
port: 2626
port: 465, SSL

WEB MAIL:
url: https://<yourdomain>:2096
url: https://<yourhost>.justhost.com:2096


NOTES:

  • SSL: you will need to accept the self signed certificate; some mail readers do not allow you to retain self signed certificates, so you will need to do that each and every time a connection (or initial connection) is made.
  • SMTP: requires authentication; also you ISP may block port 25 (which is why port 2626 is also supported).
  • <yourhost> would be something like cl111 so for example cl111.justhost.com
  • <yourdomain> would be something like mydomain.com so for example mail.mydomain.com

Originally posted 2010-03-05 02:00:49.

Windows Live Mail Bugs

Make sure you’re sitting down, I wouldn’t want you to fall over — but there are bugs in Live Mail.

I actually did the Beta for Live Mail quite some time ago, and reported several bugs during the course of that — from my experience you’re wasting your time reporting bugs to Microsoft, each and every bug I found made it into the first release, and almost all of them are still there.

Here are two bugs that really need to be fixed.  Both are annoyances (they won’t result in the loss of data for sure); but both of them speak to the attention to quality and detail that simply isn’t part of the Microsoft culture.

The first bug which really needs to be fixed has to do with viewing a folder in an account.  Many times when you perform and operation (like deleting a folder for instance) Live Mail will repaint the folder view; however, it repositions the view port at the first item (but leaves focus where it should be)… the problem is if you have more folders that fit vertically on the screen, you’re looking at an entirely different time zone than the one that has focus.  A simple fix — save the view port position before the operation; restore the view port position after it if and before the repaint.  I guess the programmer that did this code was sleeping during Windows Programming 101.

The second bug which also really needs to be fixed has to do with dragging an email into the file system.  Windows Live Mail will create a file system safe name for the container file from the subject; however, if the subject ends in “…” (and probably many other character sequences) the file doesn’t get a “.eml” file extension, but rather a “._eml” file extension.  I guess the programmer that did this code figured it was right to make the file name file system safe after appending the extension when he should have made the base name file system safe and then appended the extension of “.eml”.

Like I said, these are simple issues — with very simple fixes… but they are fixes that shouldn’t be been necessary since this code should have never gotten out of Beta with these problems (they were reported).  In fact, I could argue that these problems should have never made it into a code build — they should have failed unit tests.

But these problems made it into release code; and these problems have existed for quite some time in release code — all I can say is that the commitment to quality I see in Microsoft software is similar to that that I see in Open Source code… so hopefully Microsoft will begin giving away more and more of it’s software at no charge so that the cost basis and the quality are on par.

Originally posted 2010-01-23 01:00:12.

Windows Live Essential 2011 – Live Mail

Or perhaps better titled: Why I continue to use a product I hate.

When Outlook Express debuted many years ago Microsoft showed the possibility of creating a email reader for Windows that was clean,simple, and powerful… and for all the problems of Outlook Express it worked.

When Microsoft shipped Windows Vista they abandoned Outlook Express in favor of Windows Mail; largely it appeared to be the same program with a few changes to make it more Vista-like.

But not long after Windows Mail hit the street, Microsoft decided to launch Windows Live Mail, and what appears to be a totally new program modeled after Outlook Express / Windows Mail was launched.  I say it was new because many of the bugs that were present in the BETA of Windows Live Mail were bugs that had been fixed in the Outlook Express code line years before (as an interesting note, several of the bugs I personally reported during the BETA of Windows Live Mail are still present in the newest version – 2011).

The previous version of Live Mail was tolerable; most of the things that were annoying about it had fairly simple ways to resolve them — and in time, maybe we’ll all figure out ways to work around the headaches in 2011; but I just don’t feel like putting so much effort into a POS software package time and time again…

And for those of you who say it’s “FREE” so you get what you get, I’d say, no — it’s not exactly free… Microsoft understands that software like this is necessary in order to have any control over user’s internet habits, so it isn’t free — you’re paying a “price” for it.

Plus, there are other alternatives… Thunderbird for one.

Why don’t I use Thunderbird… simple, there is one “feature” lacking in Thunderbird that prevents me from embracing it.  You cannot export account information and restore it.  Sure Mozbackup will let you backup a complete profile and transfer it to another machine — but I want access to individual email accounts.

Why?  Well, here’s the scenario that I always hit.

I travel, and I tend to take my netbook with me when I travel — and often I’m using my cell phone to access the internet… while it’s “fast” by some standards… if you were to re-sync fifty email accounts each with a dozen IMAP folders, you’d take all day.  Further, most of those email accounts are uninteresting on a day-to-day basis, particularly when I travel — I only want to access a couple of those accounts for sure, but I might want to load an account on demand (you never know).  What I do with Live Mail is I have all the IAF files for all my email accounts stored on the disk (I sync them from my server), and I setup the mail program by loading the three or four that I use routinely, the others I only load as I need them, and I remove them from Live Mail when done.

OK — so that doesn’t fit you… here’s another.

You’ve got several computers, and you’d like to setup your email quickly and painlessly on all of them… but you don’t need all your email accounts on everyone of them — plus you add and remove accounts over time.  Again, Live Mail and it’s import/export handles this nicely.  You simply export a set of IAF files, and then import the ones you want on each machine.

The question is why doesn’t Thunderbird have this ability?

Well, there was a plug in for an older version of Thunderbird that did kinda this; of course it didn’t work that well for the version it was written for, and it doesn’t work at all for newer versions.

One more that I consider an annoyance (but it’s probably slightly more than that) is that there is no easy way in Thunderbird to change the order of accounts in the account window — and they’re not order alphabetically (that would make too much sense), they’re ordered chronologically (based on when you created them).  So you can re-order them, if you delete the accounts and add them back in the order you’d like them to appear; but wait, you can’t add an account any way in Thunderbird by type in all the information again.

And if you’re thinking, OK so write a plug-in that manages account ordering and import/export.  Sure, that would be the “right” thing to do if Thunderbird really had an interface to get to that information easily — but no, it appears you’d have to parse a javaScript settings file… oh joy.

These should be core features of Thunderbird; and in my mind they are huge barriers to wide acceptance.

Originally posted 2010-11-12 02:00:32.