Entries Tagged as 'Cellular'

iJoke

I’ve never owned an iPhone; and since the only network they work on (in the US) is AT&T I’ve never considered one… but given the large number of people who swear by them, I naturally just assumed that it must be a modern smart phone.

Well, perhaps Apple should call the iPhone the iJoke — because that’s what it is.

No multi-tasking in any currently shipping iPhone… wow — what a basic (and necessary) feature to be omitted from the iPhone.

No wonder the iPhone purports to be more stable than Windows Mobile devices — they simply aren’t anywhere near the same caliber devices.

Windows Mobile has had multi-tasking for a very very very long time — in fact, since well before Windows CE was badged as Windows Mobile multi-tasking was part of the operating system.

I just can’t image a “computer” device made in the last decade that doesn’t do multi-tasking… how simply archaic… how simply useless for a pda / smart phone.

For instance; on all iPhones sold to date when you make a telephone call while trying to use your phone for navigation — navigation becomes useless, and may well miss your turn unless you know where you’re going (and why would you be using navigation if you knew where you are going).

I just don’t get it — and apparently most people who own iPhones don’t either — you paid good money for a joke… you wasted money for something that does one thing at a time, and only one thing at a time.

I’ve had Windows smart phones for much longer than the iPhone has been in existence — I paid less for them than the iPhone cost and they do way more than the iPhone did when it was released and still does.

Get a real smart phone — buy a Windows Mobile device or an Android based device, or just admit to the world you carry a fashion accessory and need to feel like the world likes you because you waste money on gadgets that simply aren’t anything more than a shinny bobble.

Originally posted 2010-06-12 02:00:05.

Kit Kat – Android 4.4 / 4.4.2

My Nexus 4 and my two Nexus 7s updated to Kit Kat about a month ago and other than Google+ becoming far more pervasive I can’t say I’ve really seen any improvements that matter much to me (yes, I’m aware that “under the hood” there are some substantial changes)…

Some things I have noticed (that I’m not happy with) are:

  • Bluetooth shuts off and cannot be turned back on until you reboot the device.
  • Bluetooth will disconnect and reconnect (by itself) from devices that worked perfectly under Jelly Bean.
  • Devices reboot periodically by themselves (without asking for confirmation — probably more often than you realize since you’re not using them continuously).
  • Devices freeze; sometimes they respond after a couple minutes — sometimes you have to power cycle them (I haven’t had a case where I had to force a reboot yet).

I’m hopeful I won’t see this on my Nexus 5 (when I start using it after the first of the year), but from what I’ve read in the forums I’m not the only one seeing stability issues with Kit Kat, and it appears to be on all devices that have received updates — including the Nexus 5.

I’m afraid this is another case of people who work on Android not really using (or testing) the product well before it hits the street — and while I don’t feel that Google employees working on Android should be forced to trade out their iPhones, I do feel that a substantial number of the engineers working on Android should have to use the latest release (maybe replace their desk phones with cellular handsets that run the latest Android version to help debug the hardware and software).

Bottom line — you might want to hold off on your move from Jelly Bean to Kit Kat until Google releases a few more updates.


 

Android: Kit Kat

Originally posted 2013-12-30 08:00:58.

I’m a valuable Verizon Wireless customer…

Or so says an email an email I got from them last week asking me to take a survey on why I hadn’t taken advantage of my ability to upgrade my phone.

When the email came in I was on the phone talking to one of my friends; and besides, email is intended to be dealt with when it’s convenient…

About two hours after the email came in, things settled down and I had some time while I was waiting on the computer to finish a backup — so I clicked the survey link.

To which I got a web browser window (that adjusted down the size of my preferred browsing window) to tell me that the survey had been closed.

WOW — I’m glad I’m a “valuable” customer, I would hate to think how “un-valuable” customers would be treated.

Let’s see…

First, I never authorized Verizon to send me any type of email other than email specifically dealing with my account (a survey in no way deals with my account — and is clearly a marketing effort), so this email would be classified as SPAM (that’s UCE – Unsolicited Commercial Email).

Second, any legitimate survey sent out would certainly have more than a two hour response time; after all, it’s not like they would know I was anywhere near the computer.

Third, I’ve already told Verizon I’m not interested in a “free” phone since I’m not interested in a new two year contract.  And frankly there should be laws against calling something free when it’s got all kinds of strings attached.

Fourth, Verizon certainly doesn’t need to send me a survey to know how I feel about them — I consider them a crappy company like all cellular providers.  And obviously, Verizon know it’s a crappy company that is afraid it couldn’t keep customers without resorting to tricking and coercing them into long contracts by selling them equipment which is locked and crippled.

I say it’s time for an open wireless system with open handsets — where like the wire line market, wireless providers cannot force you to purchase a device from them, and they have to compete without all these tricks and fine print.

Certainly Verizon (like other cellular companies) have worked very hard to make sure that I as a customer will look out for my interests, and jump to any provider that offers me reasonable service at a reasonable price.

Customer loyalty?  Well, that’s about as rare as customer service in the cellular industry!

Verizon Wireless

NOTE: Verizon Wireless sent out a new survey email the next evening (even after I explicitly “unsubscribed” from the email list used to send the original one) with “CORRECTED LINK” added to the subject. Once again I got the message:

This survey link is no longer valid. Thank you for your time and consideration in trying to complete this survey.

Originally posted 2010-07-25 02:00:31.

iPhone 4

Yesterday (Monday) Apple CEO Steve Job unveiled the iPhone 4 — you know, the phone that his arrogance and ego caused a reporters home to be raided and computer and media to be confiscated (enough reason in itself that I would never buy one).

The iPhone 4 itself is thinner, lighter, able to multi-task, shoot reasonably high quality video and stills, has a font and rear facing camera — and tons and tons of limitations.

To coincide with the release of the new iPhone 4 AT&T eliminated their $30 flat rate data plan; but of course Apple is sticking with AT&T as the exclusive American provider for the iPhone 4 (which probably has a great deal to do with the fact that it didn’t get the name iPhone 4G since AT&T doesn’t have a 4G network).

I personally just don’t get it — if what AT&T says about how little most of their customers use data is true, then why do they sell so many iPhones?  Do people really doubt their self worth so much that they feel they need to carry around a shinny gadget to try and make others think better or them (the joke would be on them — watching someone fumble with an iPhone and barely able to make or receive a phone call with it certainly doesn’t improve their images).

And remember, AT&T maintains that iPhones cannot be unlocked (though iPhones purchased through other providers get unlocked directly by Apple once customers have satisfied their contractual commitments all the time).

It’ll be interesting to see how the Apple -HTC lawsuits play out — I think it would be all too sweet if the big bully in Cupertino got bitch slapped a few times.  And I wouldn’t lose any sleep when AT&T finds themselves in hot water over the issue of “unlocking”.

Most people don’t have a clue what to do with a smart phone, so I’d suggest you purchase something practical that meets your needs, and not treat your phone like a fashion accessory.

You’ll have to wait until 24 June for the launch — like most every Apple announcement, they’re just baiting the trap at the moment.

Originally posted 2010-06-08 02:00:07.

Open Source Mobile Operating System

So everyone knows about Google’s Android effort to develop an open source mobile operating system; but there’s competition in that market.  In fact — Google wasn’t there first.  LiMo was.

With players like Motorola, Samsung, LG, Nokia, NTT DoCoMo, NEC, Panasonic, Verizon Wireless, SK telecom, and Vodafone the list of supporters was a who’s who in the cellular industry… and what you might not know is that there have been a number of LiMo handsets; many of which were fairly successful.

  • Motorola: ROKR EM30, MOTO U9, MOTO Z6w, MOTORAZR2 V8, MOTORAZR2 V2 Luxury Edition, MOTOROKR Z6, MOTOROKR E8
  • NTT DoCoMo/NEC: docomo STYLE series N-01B/N-03B/N-08A/N-02A, docomo PRIME series N-02B/N-07A/N-06A/N-01A/N-03A, docomo SMART series N-09A/N-04A, docomo FOMA N706ie/905ip/N705iu/N705i/N905i
  • NTT DoCoMo/Panasonic: docomo STYLE series P-02G/P-10A/P-08A/P-06A/P-02A/P-03A, docomo SMART series P-03B/P-09A/P-04A, docomo PRIME series P-01B/P-07A/P-01A/P-05A, docomo FOMA P706ie/P906i/P905iTV/P905i/P705i/P705iu
  • Samsung: SCH-M510
  • Vodaphone/Samsung: 360 M1, 360 H1

Android is, of course, currently the second largest operating system for smart phones (behind RIM’s Blackberry OS); I’ve never seen LiMo listed in the rankings.

LiMo Platform

LiMo Platform

Originally posted 2010-08-15 02:00:45.

Cellular Carriers and Plans

In this day and age you have a choice of a fair number of cellular carriers… actually there aren’t that many carriers in any one geographic area, but there are quite a few resellers.

Nation wide the big cellular carriers are:

  • Verizon (CDMA)
  • AT&T (GSM)
  • Sprint (CDMA)
  • T-Mobile

Regionally there are a number of others:

  • AllTel

And of course there are a number of resellers:

  • MetroPCS (limited areas, unlimited plans, resells Sprint)
  • Boost (pre-pay, resells Verizon)
  • TracPhone (pre-pay, resells Sprint)
  • Virgin Mobile (pre-pay, resells Sprint)

And a new kid on the block:

  • Helios (I believe they actually resell Sprint, but I’m not sure)

The question is always which carrier and plan is best for me?

That’s a difficult decision, let me illustrate some things to consider by characterizing the service I have and why…

I have an AllTel PDA phone (Motorola Q) because AllTel offers a very competative price on PDA service, unlimitd nights and weekends (nights start at 7pm), free in-network service (important because most of my relatives have AllTel service), and provides lots of free features (unlimited text, unlimited data, ability to tether to my laptop, no charge for roaming — you do tend to roam on Sprint, but do roam on Verizon and other carriers when there’s no AllTel or Sprint service).  And AllTel provides “MyCircle”, which is a group of number (on any network or land lines), the plan I have provides for 10 numbers.

Essentially, this service saves me a great deal of money by making most of my calls airtime free because of the nights-and-weekends, in-network, and designated airtime free numbers.

 

In addition I also have a Verizon cell phone because I have so many friends nationwide that have Verizon numbers (it saves them airtime charges, and allows me to carry an account that has a very low number of minutes).  Verizon, though, charges for just about every additional feature — so the plan always ends up costing more than you expect.  Of course I also get a 19% discount on my services (because of a Corporate Discount program I was able to take advantage of).

 

My point in going into the above, is there’s a lot of details you need to consider other than just the number of minutes… who do you call, when do you call — are there any special features that you can take advantage or — are there enhanced services you need or want — do you travel…

My advice would be “profile” how, when, and how much you use your current service, then look at all the carriers and figure out what service would cost.

For instance, if you rarely travel and don’t want to have a landline you might find that MetroPCS gives you the absolute lowest cost service…

Whereas, if you only use your cell phone very rarely, you might find that one of the pre-paid plans give you the absolute lowest cost service (the major carriers also offer pre-pay; but selecting a pre-paid plan requires you understand minute expire and charges, and most pre-pay providers offer more than one pre-pay option).

Lastly, remember that there are taxes charged to your cell phone based on where you specify your billing address and primary useage area.  Many pre-pay providers don’t charge extra for the taxes (they obviously build it into their billing model)… but other carries do.

There’s no way you’re going to avoid the federal taxes on your phone; but your cellular company might be charging you a number portability fee (consider that when comparing carriers), and the location you base your service and billing address greatly effect the local taxes (for instance, the City/County of San Francisco access an $8.00 cell phone tax per line).  You’ll often find you can save a substantial amount of money by using an alternate service / billing address.

 

Let me know if there are any glaring omissions or mistakes!

Originally posted 2008-05-12 12:53:27.

Apple – Double or Nothing?

Yesterday Apple announced another record quarter in sales.  In fact, iPhone sales doubled in Q4 2009 (a good holiday present for Apple).

Tomorrow Apples announces a new tablet computer (at least that’s the rumor of what they will announce).

Google has a lot of ground to catch up with Apple in the phone market, and it certainly doesn’t appear that Apple is going to just stand by and wait for them.

I guess the one thing that Apples numbers show is that there is money to be made in economic hard times if you’ve got something people want.

Originally posted 2010-01-26 01:00:44.

4% of the Market; 50% of the Profit

Apple’s iPhone accounts for only 4% of the cellular handset market for “feature” phones, yet account for 50% of the profits…



asymco.com

Originally posted 2010-11-29 02:00:46.

Simple Mobile

For those of you who live in areas where T-Mobile has good service, perhaps the best deal in cellular might be Simple Mobile; you can either purchase a GSM phone from them (the price is of course not subsidized that includes one of their SIM cards), or just purchase a mini, micro, or nano SIM card from them for your unlocked GSM phone.  Monthly rates are $40, and that includes unlimited voice, unlimited SMS/MMS, unlimited 3G data, and up to 250MB of 4G data — all on T-Mobile.

I haven’t tried the service, mainly because T-Mobile coverage isn’t very good in this area; but again, if T-Mobile coverage is good where you use your cellular phone this should be one of the least expensive ways to get an unlimited plan.

If you already have a GSM handset that you’ve satisfied the contract on, there’s no question you can save money by switching; if you haven’t just subtract the cost of the monthly feed form your current monthly plan and then divide the cost of the phone by the difference (that’s the length of time it will take before you start saving money).

http://www.mysimplephones.com/

Originally posted 2013-03-18 08:00:10.

HTC Touch Pro

I’ve admired HTC cellular (PDA) phones for a very long time… their cost, though, has always made me choose an alternate.

With the release of the very popular Touch Diamond and Touch Pro (Windows Mobile 6.1) phones has come the opportunity to buy one at an aggressive price ($200 with no contract if you shop wisely on Craigslist).

Most all of the HTC phones are hackable, and there’s a large community preparing custom ROM sets for them.

You’ve never seen a HTC phone?  Well, you may not have seen HTC’s phones, but you’ve probably seen a derivative of their Touch Flow 3D interface… whether they’d like to admit it on not a company in Cupertino popularized that type of interface on a phone they sell in the US through AT&T.

You can check out HTC’s site (URL below) for a list of all the various handsets they make (and not all of them are Windows Mobile — you might notice they also make the Android based G1).

I purchased the Touch Pro because it has both a touch screen and a keyboard… it’s a little thicker than the Diamond Touch, but I’m just not willing to give up on the keyboard yet — but I wanted a touch screen to make browsing the web a little less tedious.  And with Windows Mobile 6.1 you can internet connection sharing built in (so you can tether you notebook very easily without paying any additional fees).

One of the first things you’ll want to do (even if you’re not changing phone carries on the handset you get) is unlock your phone… primarily so that you can flash a custom ROM in that matches your own tastes (you can even customize many of the ROMs yourself).

Touch Flow 3D is wizzy and cool… and will amaze your friends, but let’s face it — isn’t battery life and functionality more important?  And simplicity goes a long way in making the phone more practical for everyday use (after all, you’re probably going to use it as a phone most of the time… or not).

At the moment I’ve got Mighty ROM loaded in my handset; it’s fairly clean, fairly light-weight; and works… I’ll consider upgrading to a Mobile 6.5 versions once those are more stable, and I might consider customizing my own ROM to remove a lot of the apps I don’t every intend to use.

By-the-way, one of the things you may find you no longer need if you go to this phone is a GPS… you can run Google Maps on it, but that requires you have an active internet connection (and that doesn’t always happen in many places), I also loaded Garmin XT on my handset, so I basically have a Garmin GPS with access to Garmin Live (weather and gas prices, I think you can pay a monthly fee for traffic, but there’s no traffic in my area).

All I can say is it’s a GREAT phone, and a wonderful PDA… and my feeling is HTC has gone a long way towards providing us with a convergent device.  Microsoft is rumored to be working on their own handset; let’s hope they’ve studies HTC and will leverage off their design.

The only negatives are battery life (always an issue with a PDA phone, but far less of an issue when you can Touchflow 3D), and radio quality (I suspect that has to do with the way they designed the radio — it’s certainly adequate when cell coverage is reasonable, but you might not get good reception in fringe areas).

http://www.htc.com/us/

Originally posted 2009-06-10 11:00:22.