Entries Tagged as 'Communications'

1and1 POP / IMAP / SMTP Settings

If you have a 1and1 hosted domain with email (like my domains are), you can use the following settings for your email client:

POP:

host: pop.1and1.com
port: 110
port: 995, SSL

IMAP:

host: imap.1and1.com
port: 143
port: 993, SSL

SMTP:

host: smtp.1and1.com (requires authentication)
port: 25
port: 587, SSL

You can access 1and1 web mail via:

http://webmail.1and1.com/

Originally posted 2008-05-19 14:26:41.

hMailServer

If you’re interested in running a fairly full featured mail server on Windows, take a look at hMailServer — it’s completely free and through version 4 Open Source.

I have a patch to V4.4.2-B279 and V4.4.2-B283 that allows you to set the directory separator for IMAP folders (by default it will use “.” — and for many people that’s not a good choice).

To get it working:

  • Download the source.
  • Download the patch.
  • Un-archive the patch
  • Apply the patch (easy to do with SVN)
  • Setup a build environment (Microsoft VS2005, Microsoft VB6, Inno Setup v5, CollabNet SVN [optional]).
  • Run the build tool (you may need to make some changes to it’s configuration).
  • Install the resulting package.
  • Edit the INI file and change the FolderSeparator to “/” or “\” (I would not advise using other characters)
  • Restart the service.

It only took me a couple hours to modify and test the code; other than installing the environment to build it (and I recommend you do that on a virtual machine since these are older tools) it should take you substantially less time.

Some notes:

  • The changes to the build configuration are not necessary; you will need to make the appropriate changes for your build environment so I would say don’t apply them.
  • The changes to the HIS_DBWrappers is because you do not need to (and in many cases it will fail) register the built DLL on your build machine; it will be packaged in the install file and registered on installation (you would only need it registered if you wanted to debug, and I recommend building, installing, and then attaching to the running process so you need not worry about configuration issues if you want to debug).
  • This is Open Source software, and it’s not MY software — I don’t make any claims about it or warrant it in any way.  It’s your responsibility to test it.  While I’m certainly interested in anything you find, I’m in no way responsible.

I have a couple more modifications I’m considering (both of which will require much more work):

  • Changing the way folders and sub-folders are stored so that the folders appear in the file system in directories that match the folder names (and removing the limits on depth and number).
  • Potentially adding a ‘search’ feature that’s integrated with WDS to quickly find messages.  Since IMAP will only search within a folder, I’m thinking about adding a special folder called “Search” and any folder created in it will actually be the search term and the results displayed will be dynamic based on WDS output. 

In case you’re wondering, I don’t really care about hMailServer as an end-point mail server; I care about to manage my IMAP message store.  I have nearly 40GB of mail, nearly 50,000 folders, and WAY too many messages store on a server with 16 spindles in a RAID5 configuration.  So my “interest” doesn’t align closely with most users.

This is only the patch file; you must download the source from here.

These are patches produced from the specific versions listed, but they can (most likely) be applied to any v4.4.2 build fairly recent).

Originally posted 2008-11-09 08:00:38.

SyncMate 3

I’ve written about Eltima’s SyncMate before, but they released a new version about a month ago, and I’ve spent some time using it and decide that it’s well wrote revisiting.

SyncMate 3 is very similar to SyncMate2; it’s an excellent utility for keeping your Mac synchronized… particularly if you have an Android phone, Windows phone, Nokia phone, depend on Google for services, etc.

Like with the previous version of SyncMate you may find that the free version has all the features you really need; but the low price of the Expert Edition might make you just go ahead and buy it for one of the useful features included with it.

The only major disappointment I had with SyncMate 3 is that it didn’t migrate my sync accounts and setting from SyncMate 2.  That’s not really an issue for most people, but I had a large number of sync devices setup in SyncMate 2 and I had customized the icons and settings quite a bit for each of the test devices.

Beyond that… SyncMate 3 worked, and worked well.

I really couldn’t test the direct Android sync since I use Google to sync my Droid; and I highly recommend you do not try and sync both directly and via Google – you’re not going to be happy with the outcome (and I guess there isn’t any real way for SyncMate to detect you’ve entered the same device twice).

One of the things I use SyncMate for is to synchronize multiple Google accounts; actually I had one main account, and prefer to have the contacts from it pushed to the other account (which are used mostly for Google Voice).

The list of features is long, and you’re much better off to view them on Eltima’s web site than have me try and list them here.

While the software is very easy to use, you’ll find that it supports a number of sophisticated features — and really what you do with it is limited to your imagination more than the software.

This is a company and product that I believe is well worth taking a look at.

SyncMate 3

Originally posted 2011-02-19 02:00:59.

Internet Service Provider Mail Servers

This is a listing of server names for various internet service providers and hosting companies I’ve complied.  Use your browser (page text) search feature to locate the one you’re interested or browse them alphabetically (this is a lengthy post).

1&1

  • pop3:  pop.1and1.com
    port 110; 995 ssl
  • imap4: imap.1and1.com
    port 143; 993 ssl
  • smtp: smtp.1and1.com
    port 25; 587 ssl

Adelphia Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.adelphia.net
  • smtp: mail.adelphia.net

AT&T Internet Service

  • pop3: postoffice.worldnet.att.net
  • smtp: mailhost.worldnet.att.net
  • nntp: netnews.att.net (dial)
  • nntp: netnews.worldnet.att.net (dial)
  • nntp: inetnews.worldnet.att.net (broadband

AOL Internet Service

  • imap4: imap.aol.com
  • smtp: smtp.aol.com

Bell Altantic Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.bellatlantic.net
  • smtp: gtei.bellatlantic.net

BellSouth Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.bellsouth.net
  • smtp: mail.bellsouth.net
  • nntp: newsgroups.bellsouth.net

BlueLight Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.bluelight.net
  • smtp: mail.bluelight.net

Brainstorm Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.gobrainstorm.net
  • smtp: mail.gobrainstorm.net

Cableone Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.cableone.net
  • smtp: authmail.cableone.net

Charter Communications

  • pop3: pop.charter.net
  • smtp: smtp.charter.net

Comcast Communications

  • pop3: mail.comcast.net
  • smtp: smtp.comcast.net
  • nntp: newsgroups.comcast.net

Compaq Internet Service

  • pop3: pop3.compaq.net
  • smtp: smtp.compaq.net
  • nntp: news.compaq.net

Compuserve Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.compuserve.com
  • smtp: smtp.compuserve.com
  • nntp: news.compuserve.com

Concentric Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.concentric.net
  • smtp: smtp.concentric.net
  • nntp: news.concentric.net

Cox Communications

  • East
    • pop3: pop.east.cox.net
    • smtp: smtp.east.cox.net
    • nntp: news.east.cox.net
  • Central
    • pop3: pop.central.cox.net
    • smtp: smtp.central.cox.net
    • nntp: newscentral.cox.net
  • West
    • pop3: pop.west.cox.net
    • smtp: smtp.west.cox.net
    • nntp: news.west.cox.net

Cypress Communications

  • pop3: pop.cypress communications.net
  • smtp: smtp.cypress communications.net

DirectNIC Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.directnic.com
  • smtp: smtp.directnic.com

Dotster

  • pop3: pop.registerapi.com
  • smtp: smtpauth.registerapi.com

Earthlink Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.earthlink.net
  • smtp: ssmtpauth.earthlink.net
  • nntp: news.east.earthlink.net
  • nntp: news.west.earthlink.net
  • ftp: ftp-www.earthlink.net

EasyCGI

  • pop3: mail.[yourdomain]
  • smtp: smtp.[yourdomain]

FrontierNet Internet Service

  • pop3: pop3.frontiernet.net
  • smtp: smtp.frontiernet.net
  • nntp: news.frontiernet.net

GoDaddy

  • pop3: mail.godaddy.com
  • smtp: [none]

Google Mail

  • pop3: pop.gmail.com
    port 995 ssl
  • imap4: imap.gmail.com
    port 993 ssl
  • smtp: smtp.gmail.com
    port 465, 587 ssl/starttls

HughesNet Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.hughes.net
  • smtp: smtp.hughes.net

Internet America Internet Service

  • pop3: pop3.airmail.net
  • smtp: mail.airmail.net

iPage

  • pop3: mail.[yourdomain]
  • smtp: mail.[yourdomain]

IX Web Hosting

  • pop3: pop.ix.netcom.com
  • smtp: smtp.ix.netcom.com

Juno Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.juno.com
  • smtp: smtp.juno.com

JustHost

  • pop3: mail.[yourdomain] port 110; 995 ssl
  • imap4: mail.[yourdomain] port 143; 993 ssl
  • smtp: mail.[yourdomain] port 25, 2626; 465, 587 ssl

Lycos

  • pop3: pop.mail.lycos.com
  • smtp: smtp.mail.lycos.com

Mac

  • pop3: mail.mac.com
  • smtp: smtp.mac.com

Mail.com

  • pop3: pop1.mail.com
  • smtp: smtp1.mail.com
  • nntp: news.mail.com

MegaPath Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.megapathdsl.net
  • smtp: mail.megapathdsl.net
  • nntp: news.megapath.net

Mediacom Online Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.mchsi.com
  • smtp: mail.mchsi.com
  • nntp: netnews.mchsi.com

Mindspring Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.mindspring.com
  • smtp: smtp.mindspring.com

Mpower Communications

  • pop3: pop.mpowercom.net
  • smtp: smtp.mpowercom.net
  • nntp: news.mpowercom.net

MSN Internet Service Provider

  • pop3: pop3.email.msn.com
  • smtp: smtp.email.msn.com
  • nntp: netnews.msn.com

Netscape

  • pop3: pop3.isp.netscape.com
  • smtp: smtp.isp.netscape.com
  • nntp: news.netscape.com

Network Solutions

  • pop3: mail.[yourdomain]
  • smtp: smtp.[yourdomain]

NetZero Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.netzero.net
  • smtp: smtp.netzero.net
  • nntp: news.netzero.net

onehost worx Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.emailworx.net
  • smtp: smtpsecure.emailworx.net

Pacifier Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.pacifier.com
  • smtp: smtp.pacifier.com

PeoplePC Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.peoplepc.com
  • smtp: smtpauth.peoplepc.com
  • nntp: news.peoplepc.com

Pipeline Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.pipeline.com
  • smtp: smtp.pipeline.com

Rediff Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.rediffmailpro.com
  • smtp: smtp.rediffmailpro.com
  • nntp: news.rediff.com

SBC Yahoo!

  • Ameritech
    • pop3: pop.ameritech.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.ameritech.yahoo.com
  • NVBell
    • pop3: pop.nvbell.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.nvbell.yahoo.com
  • PacBell
    • pop3: pop.pacbell.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.pacbell.yahoo.com
  • SNet
    • pop3: pop.snet.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.snet.yahoo.com
  • SWBell
    • pop3: pop.swbell.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.swbell.yahoo.com

  • Flash
    • pop3: pop.flash.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.flash.yahoo.com
  • Prodigy
    • pop3: pop.sbcglobal.net
    • smtp: smtpauth.prodigy.net
  • Wans
    • pop3: pop.wans.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.wans.yahoo.com
  • – Other –
    • pop3: pop.sbcglobal.yahoo.com
    • smtp: smtp.sbcglobal.yahoo.com

Seanet Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.seanet.com
  • smtp: mx.seanet.com
  • nntp: news.seanet.com

Sonic.net Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.sonic.net
  • smtp: mail.sonic.net
  • nntp: news.sonic.net

Speakeasy Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.speakeasy.net
  • smtp: mail.speakeasy.net
  • nntp: news.speakeasy.net

SprintPCS

  • pop3: pop.sprintpcs.com
  • smtp: smtp.sprintpcs.com

Sprynet Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.sprynet.com
  • smtp: smtp.sprynet.com

Starpower Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.starpower.net
  • smtp: smtp.starpower.net
  • nntp: news.starpower.net

Time Warner

  • Alabama (Birmingham)
    • pop3: pop-server.bham.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.bham.rr.com
  • Alabama (Dothan)
    • pop3: pop-server.sw.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sw.rr.com
  • Alabama (Eufaula)
    • pop3: pop-server.eufaula.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.eufaula.rr.com
  • California (Bakersfield)
    • pop3: pop-server.bak.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.bak.rr.com
  • California (San Diego)
    • pop3: pop-server.san.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.san.rr.com
  • California (Southern / Los Angeles)
    • pop3: pop-server.socal.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.socal.rr.com
  • California (Desert Cities)
    • pop3: pop-server.dc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.dc.rr.com
  • Florida (Cantonment)
    • pop3: pop-server.panhandle.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.panhandle.rr.com
  • Florida (Central Florida, Orlando)
    • pop3: pop-server.clf.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.clf.rr.com
  • Florida (Cape Coral / Naples)
    • pop3: pop-server.swfla.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.swfla.rr.com
  • Florida (Lake City / Live Oak)
    • pop3: pop-server.se.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.se.rr.com
  • Florida (Palatka)
    • pop3: pop-server.se.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.se.rr.com
  • Florida (St Augustine)
    • pop3: pop-server.se.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.se.rr.com
  • Florida (Tampa Bay)
    • pop3: pop-server.tampabay.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.tampabay.rr.com
  • Georgia (Ft. Benning)
    • pop3: pop-server.sw.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sw.rr.com
  • Indiana (Indianapolis)
    • pop3: pop-server.indy.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.indy.rr.com
  • Indiana (Terre Haute)
    • pop3: pop-server.ma.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ma.rr.com
  • Kansas (Kansas City)
    • pop3: pop-server.kc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.kc.rr.com
  • Kansas (Colby)
    • pop3: pop-server.we.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.we.rr.com
  • Louisiana (Houma)
    • pop3: pop-server.sw.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sw.rr.com
  • Louisiana (La Place)
    • pop3: pop-server.sw.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sw.rr.com
  • Louisiana (Monroe)
    • pop3: pop-server.jam.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.jam.rr.com
  • Louisiana (Shreveport)
    • pop3: pop-server.sport.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sport.rr.com
  • Maine (Southeast Maine, Portland)
    • pop3: pop-server.maine.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.maine.rr.com
  • Massachusettes (Athol)
    • pop3: pop-server.mass.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.mass.rr.com
  • Massachusettes (Berkshire County)
    • pop3: pop-server.berkshire.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.berkshire.rr.com
  • Michigan (Detroit)
    • pop3: pop-server.twmi.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.twmi.rr.com
  • Minnesota (Minneapolis)
    • pop3: pop-server.mn.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.mn.rr.com
  • Mississippi (Jackson)
    • pop3: pop-server.jam.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.jam.rr.com
  • Missouri (Kansas City)
    • pop3: pop-server.kc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.kc.rr.com
  • Nebraska (Lincoln)
    • pop3: pop-server.neb.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.neb.rr.com
  • New Hampshire (Keene)
    • pop3: pop-server.ne.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ne.rr.com
  • New Jersey (Bergen)
    • pop3: pop-server.nj.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.nj.rr.com
  • New York (Albany)
    • pop3: pop-server.nycap.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.nycap.rr.com
  • New York (Central Northern)
    • pop3: pop-server.twcny.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.twcny.rr.com
  • New York (Hudson Valley, Catskills)
    • pop3: pop-server.hvc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.hvc.rr.com
  • New York (New York City, Manhattan)
    • pop3: pop-server.nyc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.nyc.rr.com
  • New York (Rochester)
    • pop3: pop-server.rochester.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.rochester.rr.com
  • New York (Binghamton, Vestal, Johnson City)
    • pop3: pop-server.stny.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.stny.rr.com
  • New York (Staten Island)
    • pop3: pop-server.si.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.si.rr.com
  • North Carolina (Raleigh, Durham, RTP)
    • pop3: pop-server.nc.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.nc.rr.com
  • North Carolina (East Carolina, Wilmington)
    • pop3: pop-server.ec.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ec.rr.com
  • North Carolina (Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High-Point)
    • pop3: pop-server.triad.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.triad.rr.com
  • North Carolina (Charlotte Metro)
    • pop3: pop-server.carolina.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.carolina.rr.com
  • Ohio (Cincinatti)
    • pop3: pop-server.cinci.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.cinci.rr.com
  • Ohio (Columbus)
    • pop3: pop-server.columbus.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.columbus.rr.com
  • Ohio (North East)
    • pop3: pop-server.neo.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.neo.rr.com
  • Ohio (Western)
    • pop3: pop-server.woh.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.woh.rr.com
  • Pennsylvania (Erie)
    • pop3: pop-server.ma.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ma.rr.com
  • Pennsylvania (Philadelphia)
    • pop3: pop-server.ucwphilly.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ucwphilly.rr.com
  • South Carolina (Columbia)
    • pop3: pop-server.carolina.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.carolina.rr.com
  • Tennessee (Memphis)
    • pop3: pop-server.midsouth.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.midsouth.rr.com
  • Texas (Austin)
    • pop3: pop-server.austin.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.austin.rr.com
  • Texas (El Paso)
    • pop3: pop-server.elp.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.elp.rr.com
  • Texas (Houston)
    • pop3: pop-server.houston.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.houston.rr.com
  • Texas (Rio Grande Valley)
    • pop3: pop-server.rgv.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.rgv.rr.com
  • Texas (San Antonio)
    • pop3: pop-server.satx.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.satx.rr.com
  • Texas (Heart of Texax – Waco, Temple, etc.)
    • pop3: pop-server.hot.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.hot.rr.com
  • Texas (Greater Texas, Beaumont)
    • pop3: pop-server.gt.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.gt.rr.com
  • Texas (Corpus Christi, Eagle Pass, Kerrville, Laredo)
    • pop3: pop-server.stx.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.stx.rr.com
  • Texas (Witchita Falls)
    • pop3: pop-server.sw.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.sw.rr.com
  • West Virginia (Clarksburg)
    • pop3: pop-server.ma.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.ma.rr.com
  • Wisconsin (Milwaukee)
    • pop3: pop-server.wi.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.wi.rr.com
  • Wisconsin (North East Wisconsin, Green Bay)
    • pop3: pop-server.new.rr.com
    • smtp: smtp-server.new.rr.com

Verizon Internet Service

  • pop3: incoming.verizon.net
  • smtp: outgoing.verizon.net
  • nntp: news.verizon.net

Verizon Wireless

  • pop3: pop.vzwmail.net
  • smtp: smtp.vzwmail.net

WildBlue Internet Service

  • pop3: mail.wildblue.net
  • smtp: mail.wildblue.net
  • nntp: news.wildblue.net

Windstream Internet Service

  • pop3: pop.windstream.net
  • smtp: smtp.windstream.net
  • nntp: news.windstream.net

Yahoo! Mail

  • pop3: pop.mail.yahoo.com
  • smtp: smtp.mail.yahoo.com
  • nntp: news.news.yahoo.com

Legend:

  • ftp: File Transfer Protocol
  • pop3: Post Office Protocol (incoming mail)
  • imap4: Internet Message Access Protocol (incoming mail)
  • nntp: Network News Transfer Protocol (news)
  • smtp: Simple Mail Transport Protocol (outgoing mail)

Notes:

Unfortunately, I cannot confirm the accuracy of most of this information; however, should you notice an error (or oversight) please contact me and I will correct it.

As I determine the encryption and ports for each provider I’ll add them as well.

Originally posted 2010-10-29 02:00:41.

Facebook

First, I don’t get Facebook, to me it’s just a site where people who don’t have a life try to pretend the do… but even if you are “into” Facebook, I’m not sure why anyone would have  invested in the Facebook IPO… let’s look at the ethics of Mark Zuckerberg (co-founder of Facebook).

The predecessor to Facebook, Facemash was populated with pictures that Zuckerberg obtained by hacking into system that had private dormitory ID image… something that should have gotten him expelled from Harvard, or thrown in jail.

Then, he went on to launch Thefacebook, and he did that by misleading a three other students into helping him build it.  Then Zuckerberg refused to give them a share of what they’d worked on, until the three filed a lawsuit (it was settled out of court).

So with a person like that at the helm of Facebook, why would we be the list bit surprised that they may have overstated their value and may have only disclosed their actual valuation to large investors (we’ll have to wait for the SEC investigation to finish to know what actually happened).

And yet millions and millions of people “trust” Facebook with their personal and confidential information — even though Facebook doesn’t really provide any controls over how that information might be used.

My advice, dump Facebook now.  Whether we’re talking about the stock you may have been conned into purchasing or the social network your use makes a very few people very wealthy off of.

Originally posted 2012-05-29 02:00:47.

One of the upsides of the internet…

One of the things that the internet allows almost everyone is the ability to express their opinion in a venue that others can “hear”.

Just do an internet search on almost anything you can think of… you’ll find reviews, comments, rants, and sometimes raves!

While you rarely know anything about the individual who wrote the posting, from a well thought out post you can gather some important questions to get the answers to before making a decision, so as a tool for an informed consumer the internet can be invaluable not only in locating the “best” prices, but also in finding the “best” products and “best” vendors!

It only takes a little effort to learn a great deal about any good or service you’re considering — it’s totally up to you whether you make an informed decision or just wing it.

Originally posted 2008-12-30 12:00:06.

Removing Pre-Installed Android Applications

First, you need to be really careful about removing pre-installed applications on your Android phone, some are necessary for it to function properly, but many of them are just bloatware and may not serve any useful purpose (also many of the pre-installed apps can be re-installed via the marketplace, and then managed as any other application).

Why do cell phone carriers / manufacturers put this bloatware on the phone — simply, MONEY — the software manufactures pay them to do so, or they will get a service fee if you use it.

If you haven’t rooted your phone; forget it… you can’t remove these applications.  Rooting some phone is very easy, but you’ll need to read up on how to do it and download the tools you need.

There are two primary simple methods for removing an application (I believe there’s also an application to do this, but I recall it not being free).

The first method is to install the Android development kit (which requires the Java development kit, not just the Java runtime).  This allows you to execute the commands from your PC (which gives you a better keyboard and display).

The second method is to install busy-box and terminal emulator on your phone from the market place.  This is pretty easy to use if you have a real keyboard, if you are forced to use a virtual keyboard on your phone, this might not be the best approach.  One hint here is use the settings on terminal to increase the font size, 14pt works best on my phone — you might also try a different color scheme to make the display more readable (you definitely want to be able to clearly read what you type).

Regardless of which of the above you do — you open a “terminal” to the phone and use the following commands (in bold):

  • su (elevate privileges to root)
  • mount -0 rw,remount -t rfw /dev/stl5 /system (remounts the rom as read-write)
  • cd /system/app (changes directory to the app directory)
  • rm -r / [AppName].apk (you need to type the name exactly as it appears)
  • ls [Pattern with wild cards] (you can use ls to view the app names installed)
  • mount -o ro,remount -t rfw /dev/stl5 /system (remounts the rom as read-only, though rebooting the phone is a good idea)

You might need to do an internet search to figure out the name of the directory (that’s what an apk is) that contains a particular application, and you can use mv rather than rm initially to move the application to a temporary location (much easier to recover if you make a mistake).

A little familiarity with *nix shell commands definitely is a plus; but as long as you’re careful it shouldn’t be a problem.

Originally posted 2011-01-03 02:00:08.

iDialer (for Windows Mobile)

If you have a cellular plan that allows you to make air-time free calls to a set of designated numbers, then Google Voice might be able to save you some money by effectively giving you unlimited calling.

I’ve written up BLOG entries on how to use Google Voice to get “free” calling before; and I’ve included the caution that you might not want to use it for calls that might contain sensitive information…

Personally I find that when I need to call “customer service” (those people you speak to at a big company that don’t provide much service at all) it generally takes forever and would quickly exhaust my monthly allowance of minutes — and I personally don’t care of Google indexes the information in the call or not.

With a Smart Phone you can use the web interface to Google Voice any time you want to make calls, if you have an Android phone Google has already provided an app that allows you to use Google Voice directly from your contacts if not, there’s a number of apps you can buy or just download that achieve that.

For those who have Windows Mobile and an unlimited data plan (like me), I use iDialer (a free app) with the pre-fab configuration for Google Voice (you can configure it for other services as well — the Google Voice one just requires you download, install, and then provide your Google Voice account information).

Bottom line — it works… though I have to tell you it’s a little odd to “dial” a call and then immediately have your phone ring to complete it… but that’s how Google Voice works (in callback mode).

It’s free, it’s easy to install, and like I said it works.

http://www.supware.net/iDialer/

Originally posted 2010-04-18 02:00:45.

iPhone on Verizon

Today Apple and Verizon announce the availability of the iPhone 4 for Verizon (CDMA upgradable to LTE)…

AT&T will attempt to point out to people that their network is faster than Verizon’s for data; though they are going to leave out that in major metropolitan areas there network is severely over-subscribed, and effectively much slower… and they will leave out that Verizon is actively deploying a 4G LTE network that is substantially faster than AT&T’s network.

Analysts are already indicating that AT&T profits are going to be down, and that Verizon is likely to make even more money.

I don’t get why anyone cares about the iPhone; but then again, I’m not sure I understand why people waste money on overpriced fashion accessories.

Originally posted 2011-01-11 02:00:44.

Anti-Malware Programs

First, malware is a reality and no operating system is immune to it.

Malware is most common on operating systems that are prevalent (no reason to target 1% of the installed base now is there); so an obscure operating system is far less likely to be the target of malware.

Malware is most common on popular operating systems that generally do not require elevation of privileges to install (OS-X, *nix, Vista, and Server 2008 all require that a user elevate their privileges before installing software, even if they have rights to administer the machine).

The reality is that even a seasoned computer professional can be “tricked” into installing malware; and the only safe computer is a computer that’s disconnected from the rest the world and doesn’t have any way to get new software onto it (that would probably be a fairly useless computer).

Beyond exercising common sense, just not installing software you don’t need or are unsure of (remember, you can install and test software in a virtual machine using UNDO disks before you commit it to a real machine), and using a hardware “firewall” (residential gateway devices should be fine as long as you change the default password, disable WAN administration, and use WPA or WPA2 on your wireless network) between you and your high-speed internet connection; using anti-malware software is your best line of defense.

There are a lot of choices out there, but one of the best you’ll find is Avast! — there’s a free edition for non-commercial use, and of course several commercial version for workstations and servers.

My experience is that on all but the slowest computers Avast! performs well, and catches more malware than most any of the big-name commercial solutions.

For slower computers that you need mal-ware protection for, consider AVG (they also have a free version for non-commercial use); I don’t find it quite as good as Avast! at stopping as wide a range of threats, but it’s much lower on resource demands (and that helps to keep your legacy machine usable).

Originally posted 2009-01-02 12:00:01.