Entries Tagged as 'Communications'

HTC Touch Pro

I’ve admired HTC cellular (PDA) phones for a very long time… their cost, though, has always made me choose an alternate.

With the release of the very popular Touch Diamond and Touch Pro (Windows Mobile 6.1) phones has come the opportunity to buy one at an aggressive price ($200 with no contract if you shop wisely on Craigslist).

Most all of the HTC phones are hackable, and there’s a large community preparing custom ROM sets for them.

You’ve never seen a HTC phone?  Well, you may not have seen HTC’s phones, but you’ve probably seen a derivative of their Touch Flow 3D interface… whether they’d like to admit it on not a company in Cupertino popularized that type of interface on a phone they sell in the US through AT&T.

You can check out HTC’s site (URL below) for a list of all the various handsets they make (and not all of them are Windows Mobile — you might notice they also make the Android based G1).

I purchased the Touch Pro because it has both a touch screen and a keyboard… it’s a little thicker than the Diamond Touch, but I’m just not willing to give up on the keyboard yet — but I wanted a touch screen to make browsing the web a little less tedious.  And with Windows Mobile 6.1 you can internet connection sharing built in (so you can tether you notebook very easily without paying any additional fees).

One of the first things you’ll want to do (even if you’re not changing phone carries on the handset you get) is unlock your phone… primarily so that you can flash a custom ROM in that matches your own tastes (you can even customize many of the ROMs yourself).

Touch Flow 3D is wizzy and cool… and will amaze your friends, but let’s face it — isn’t battery life and functionality more important?  And simplicity goes a long way in making the phone more practical for everyday use (after all, you’re probably going to use it as a phone most of the time… or not).

At the moment I’ve got Mighty ROM loaded in my handset; it’s fairly clean, fairly light-weight; and works… I’ll consider upgrading to a Mobile 6.5 versions once those are more stable, and I might consider customizing my own ROM to remove a lot of the apps I don’t every intend to use.

By-the-way, one of the things you may find you no longer need if you go to this phone is a GPS… you can run Google Maps on it, but that requires you have an active internet connection (and that doesn’t always happen in many places), I also loaded Garmin XT on my handset, so I basically have a Garmin GPS with access to Garmin Live (weather and gas prices, I think you can pay a monthly fee for traffic, but there’s no traffic in my area).

All I can say is it’s a GREAT phone, and a wonderful PDA… and my feeling is HTC has gone a long way towards providing us with a convergent device.  Microsoft is rumored to be working on their own handset; let’s hope they’ve studies HTC and will leverage off their design.

The only negatives are battery life (always an issue with a PDA phone, but far less of an issue when you can Touchflow 3D), and radio quality (I suspect that has to do with the way they designed the radio — it’s certainly adequate when cell coverage is reasonable, but you might not get good reception in fringe areas).

http://www.htc.com/us/

Originally posted 2009-06-10 11:00:22.

Android Apps

One of the initial complaints the reviewers of Android handsets underscored was that the number of apps (applications) available for Android was minimal compared to the number available for the iPhone, and most of the reviewers theorized it would take years for their to be a substantial number of quality apps.

Today, there are a tremendous number of apps; but like the apps for the iPhone I’d say most of them are of questionable quality… a few though are keepers.

Last week a joint survey conducted by Appcelerator and IDC found that 59% of developers said that Google’s Android had the “best long-term outlook” compared to only 35% who picked Apple’s iOS.

Additionally, 72% picked Android for hardware other than phones (set-top boxes, etc) while less than 25% choose iOS.

Though Apple maintained 84% of the interest in tablets (that may have a great deal to do with the fact that no mainstream company has shipped an Android based tablet yet and is very likely to shift soon).

Anyway, regardless of who’s the most popular (ie McDonald’s thinking), here’s my “short” list (categorized) of apps for Android that I like (and use).

Communications

  • Google Voice
  • GMail
  • sipdroid
  • Call Block
  • Opera

Utilities

  • Explorer
  • ASTRO
  • ASTRO Bluetooth Module
  • Spell Checker
  • GPS Essentials
  • Spare Parts
  • DynDns
  • Barcode Scanner
  • ShopSavvy
  • Tricorder
  • Wifi Analyzer
  • WifiScanner
  • Terminal Emulator
  • ROM Manager (only useful on a rooted handset)
  • Superuser (only useful on a rooted handset)

Games

  • 205+ Solitaire Collection
  • Mahjong 3D

Eye Candy

  • Sense Analog Clock
  • Mickey Mouse Clock
  • Tricorder

Everything on the list is FREE (as in free beer; some of the current versions are ad supported).

Tricoder is in two categories (it’s actually useful — though it only qualifies as useful because it will do with several other utilities in combination are needed for — though it’s gotta be considered eye candy).

I’m not a gamer, so the only games I’ve listed are ones that are pretty good for just whiling away a little time… there’s a ton of free games — have at it, you can uninstall them fairly easily (though if you install a lot of apps you’re going to want something to help manager / organize).

One of the major reasons for having a smart phone is to use it to make calls; certainly Google Voice lets you take advantage of any ability you have to call specified numbers air-time-free (plus it gives you text messaging without incurring any charges from your carrier).  If you have a very limited voice plan, but a flat rate data plan — you might find sipdroid (a SIP/VoIP client) extremely useful; at least when you couple it with a free SIP service.

One of the major reasons you might consider rooting your Android device is so that you can remove pre-installed apps or re-theme the device; with older devices you might consider it so that you have access to newer kernels and fixes.  For the average person, you probably don’t want to root your device.

If you have other favorites that do something useful, let me know… I’m likely to publish another list of Android apps in a few months; and I’ve decided I’m going to write a few of them (maybe I’ll even publish them).

Originally posted 2010-10-13 02:00:50.

Mobile Enabled

I’ve had a fair number of requests from individuals who wanted to be able to view my web site and BLOG on their cell phones. Changing my web site to support micro-browsers will be a fair amount of work; but I’ve installed a mobile friendly theme on my BLOG which should auto-magically detect most mobile browsers and provide you with a rendering of the site that you can navigate and read on your phone (or other hand held device). I’ve tested it on a Windows Mobile 6.5 device, and it seems to work. I’ve also tested it with a number of WAP emulators (Nokia N70, Samsung z105, Sony Ericson k750i, Motorola v3i, and Sharp GX-10) and it’s acceptable. For any real mobile browser (iPhone, Blackberry, etc) it should be fine. I will consider how best to support mobile browsers from my web site, but that won’t be something I change very soon.


http://m.rogersoles.com/ or http://m.blog.rogersoles.com/ should get you to the mobile site; but if the plug-in that’s doing the work is doing it’s job your mobile browser should be automatically detected even using the desktop address.

Originally posted 2010-03-23 01:30:17.

Report Fraud

Each and every time you encounter someone trying to defraud you make sure you report it.

Phishing scams, money scams, premium SMS message, suspicious phone calls, un-authorized phone charges, un-authorized credit card charges, etc — go ahead and visit the IC3 (Internet Crime Complaint Center; a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI], the National White Collar Crime Center [NW3C], and the Bureau of Justice Assistance [BJA]) and file a report.

Take action and let the law enforcement community decide what’s a threat and what’s not – but DO NOT remain silent or these problems will continue.

http://www.ic3.gov/

 

NOTE:  If you have an un-authorized charge on any of your bills you will also want to contact your billing company and dispute the charge with them; the IC3 will not do this for you.

Originally posted 2008-10-24 13:00:38.

3D

The TV and Motion Picture studios have been discussing the relevance of 3D and the impact on the medium.

For the moment they’re taking the same stand they took in the twenties towards talking motion pictures…

Maybe they’re right – maybe resistance is futile.

Certainly we’re at a point in the technological curve where 3D can be in every display produced — whether it’s a big screen TV, a cell phone, or an ATM machine… so it may well be if the traditional studios won’t take advantage of the medium by producing content, and new generation of media centric studios will be founded.

Originally posted 2010-10-10 02:00:04.

Does your mail provider really want to eliminate SPAM?

I’ve been actively working to stop SPAM (that’s also known as UCE – Unsolicited Commercial Email) for a very long time, and it’s great to see how many of the “free” email providers talk about preventing SPAM and provide users with filters to prevent SPAM from reaching their inbox.

But, the bottom line is, that unless you actively report SPAMmers nothing will ever really change.

Some providers (very few) actually will generate automated SPAM reports for you [that’s great, more email providers should make it that easy]; however, most will do nothing more than use an email that you mark as SPAM to refine their filters [which might prevent you from seeing the SPAM, but it doesn’t stop the SPAMmer].

The really interesting thing is that many of the “free” email providers actually inhibit you from reporting SPAM by preventing you from accessing the “raw message” (you need all the headers and the body of the email to file an abuse report with most carriers).  What’s really funny is that some of the providers who are most vocal have actually changed their web-mail interfaces to prevent you from accessing the raw message [essentially insuring that you cannot take action against a SPAMmer].

Now if you can access you email via POP3 or IMAP4 or load it into an email client using a proprietary connector (well, at least the only ones I could test) you can access the raw message and file a report; but remember, many of the free email providers don’t give you that type of access to your email unless you pay them.

What a great message… it’s OK to SPAM free email subscribers because they can’t do anything about it!

I’m not going to provide an extensive list of those providers that do and do not actually enable you to report SPAM; I’ll just mention that Yahoo! (one of the largest free email providers, but waning) doesn’t allow free subscribers to access raw message (or if they do, I certainly couldn’t figure out how); and of course Google (GMail) and Microsoft (MSN/HotMail/Live/Bing) do allow access.

One other thing to keep in mind… there’s no such thing as free email — you’re paying for it some how some way.

Originally posted 2009-08-17 01:00:04.

Goog-rola

What does $12.5 billion get you in today’s economy?

For Google, it just might get them Motorola Mobility.

For me, I’m wondering what’s going to happen to the Open Handset Alliance.

Motorola is a very large manufacturer of mobile devices (cell phones, smart phones, and tablets) — and it’s roots are over 80 years old.

Google’s CEO Larry Page stated that (at least for the time being) Google intends to run Motorola Mobility as a separate company, and that there will still be the exchange of license fees for Android, and that they will need to bid on manufacturing future Nexus phones just as every other vendor would.

Right…  I believe all that.

My gut tells me this is all subject to change (quickly) that Google will use it’s acquisition of Motorola to change the landscape of Android devices and they won’t be a separate company; while they might not be tightly integrated into Google they will be very coordinated with Google.

One has to wonder, what’s next for Google — a cellular carrier (or maybe a few)…

Originally posted 2011-08-15 10:00:59.

Toshiba IS02

The Toshiba IS02 is a Windows Mobile 6.5.3 powered smart phone with a 1GHz Snapdragon processor and a 4.1″ AMOLED touchscreen sporting a 3.2MP digital camera, 384MB RAM, 512MB ROM, business card reader, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi with a GSM quad-band radio and 3G data.

It’s reported to be one of the slimmest WinMo phones available — and it has a full slide-out QWERTY keyboard!

Hopefully Toshiba will export the phone to the American market, and continue to innovate and push the competition.

Toshiba IS02

Originally posted 2010-07-19 02:00:11.

Free Hosted Email

If you have your own domain and you really don’t need web hosting you might want to consider hosted email servers from Microsoft or Google.

Both of them provide free hosted email services; limited to 500 accounts (which can actually be increased — but for free hosted email that’s probably fine).

I generally recommend that you consider just getting a hosting package that gives you a free domains, web space, and email — often on the order of $1.99 per month.

Microsoft Live Hosted Email (Free):  http://domains.live.com/

Goolge GMail Hosted Email (Free):  http://www.google.com/a/

Originally posted 2008-08-12 23:12:04.

No Facebook

As I’ve said more than once, I view Facebook as something people who don’t have a life who want to pretend they do use… people with lives are too busy living them.

 

No Facebook

Originally posted 2013-12-20 20:00:48.