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Removing Pre-Installed Android Applications

First, you need to be really careful about removing pre-installed applications on your Android phone, some are necessary for it to function properly, but many of them are just bloatware and may not serve any useful purpose (also many of the pre-installed apps can be re-installed via the marketplace, and then managed as any other application).

Why do cell phone carriers / manufacturers put this bloatware on the phone — simply, MONEY — the software manufactures pay them to do so, or they will get a service fee if you use it.

If you haven’t rooted your phone; forget it… you can’t remove these applications.  Rooting some phone is very easy, but you’ll need to read up on how to do it and download the tools you need.

There are two primary simple methods for removing an application (I believe there’s also an application to do this, but I recall it not being free).

The first method is to install the Android development kit (which requires the Java development kit, not just the Java runtime).  This allows you to execute the commands from your PC (which gives you a better keyboard and display).

The second method is to install busy-box and terminal emulator on your phone from the market place.  This is pretty easy to use if you have a real keyboard, if you are forced to use a virtual keyboard on your phone, this might not be the best approach.  One hint here is use the settings on terminal to increase the font size, 14pt works best on my phone — you might also try a different color scheme to make the display more readable (you definitely want to be able to clearly read what you type).

Regardless of which of the above you do — you open a “terminal” to the phone and use the following commands (in bold):

  • su (elevate privileges to root)
  • mount -0 rw,remount -t rfw /dev/stl5 /system (remounts the rom as read-write)
  • cd /system/app (changes directory to the app directory)
  • rm -r / [AppName].apk (you need to type the name exactly as it appears)
  • ls [Pattern with wild cards] (you can use ls to view the app names installed)
  • mount -o ro,remount -t rfw /dev/stl5 /system (remounts the rom as read-only, though rebooting the phone is a good idea)

You might need to do an internet search to figure out the name of the directory (that’s what an apk is) that contains a particular application, and you can use mv rather than rm initially to move the application to a temporary location (much easier to recover if you make a mistake).

A little familiarity with *nix shell commands definitely is a plus; but as long as you’re careful it shouldn’t be a problem.

Ubuntu 11.10

I tested out an upgrade of Ubuntu 11.10 on a virtual machine and on a desktop machine… it seemed to go fairly well; but I can’t say that Unity really feels like something that was the result of human factor engineering.

I decided to go ahead and phase in the 11.10 upgrade to three of my five servers; and let me tell you that was a huge mistake.

First, I found that the upgrade didn’t properly detect the disk to update the grub configuration on (my RAID controller is the first device discovered, so it makes the motherboard SATA controllers come after that so my boot device is sdb rather than sda).

Then I found that FreeNX simply will not install on 11.10 — but I was able to fall back to the NoMachines.com “free” NX server.

Then I found that neither VNC or NX would work properly with Unity; simply switching to KDE fixed that.

What a nightmare.

What should have been a half hour upgrade turned into a day of wasted time… and for what?

This experience has definitely diminished my faith in the Ubuntu development community, and I find myself asking why should I continue to support a product that’s heading in a direction that I do not like, and obviously isn’t meshing well with the rest of the Open Source community.

What’s wrong with GNOME?  What’s wrong with KDE?  Why do we need lightdm and Unity as the defaults in a product that users depend on?  Particularly when Unity doesn’t seem to resolve any of the complaints I have about useability.

Personally I’d favor a desktop along the lines of Macbuntu for usability (it doesn’t have to look like a Mac, but at least pick a interface that looks coherent, and make it act coherent).

I think I might consider moving my servers back to Centos and returning to stability… to me it looks like Ubuntu is becoming the next Windows of the Linux world (and I have no need to be in line for that roller coaster).

WhiteHouse.gov Petition – The federal government should implement the proposed minimum wage for all federal employees now.

Require the federal government to immediately raise pay for all federal employees to comply with the new proposed minimum wage.

…click here…

 


Shouldn’t the US government set an example to business and state governments by paying it’s employees the proposed new minimum wage?

Sign the petition.

Get a free PC safety scan

Microsoft is offering a free scan utility to check your PC for malware (viruses); get rid of junk on your hard drive; and improve your PC’s performance.

It’s part of the Windows Live offering, and an on-demand utility.  You can purchase continuous protection from Microsoft with Windows Live OneCare.

http://onecare.live.com/site/en-us/default.htm

GB-PVR

For many a computer hooked up to their TV is going to become more and more common place over the next few years… and certainly Vista Media Center does a great deal to close the gap between consumer electronics and computers; but for those who want more it falls short.

One of the biggest failings of Vista Media Center is that it doesn’t support H.264 natively as a video recording type… and many of the external HD recorders transmit their stream in H.264 (not MPEG-2 like ATSC/DVB systems do).

There are, of course, a host of for pay media programs for your PC you could look at — things like Beyond TV and Sage TV have been around for years… but the new kid on the block is a freeware project called GB-PVR.

GB-PVR is fairly full featured, and it’s likely that it will work with your hardware provided you have drivers, and it’s a reasonable fully featured media program.  You can get a copy and try it out from the link below, as well as read up on it.

http://www.gbpvr.com/

If those I loved were lost

If those I loved were lost
by Emily Dickinson

If those I loved were lost
The Crier’s voice would tell me —
If those I loved were found
The bells of Ghent would ring —

Did those I loved repose
The Daisy would impel me.
Philip — when bewildered
Bore his riddle in!

Mega Church – Mega Sex Scandle

Bishop Eddie Long of the New Birth Missionary Baptist Church in Lithonia, Georgia (just East of Atlanta) has been accused by three young male members of his congregation for sexual impropriety.

It’s yet another example of religious figures potentially using their position of authority and respect to seduce individuals who trust and respect them.

In this case, apparently the church leader seduced the boys by providing them with cars, money, clothes, jewelry, international trips, and access to celebrities.

What is totally hilarious about this particular case of homosexual relations between Long and three boys is that Long had joined with Rev Bernice King (the youngest daughter of the late Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr and also a pastor at the New Birth Missionary Baptist Church) in a march in 2004 in Atlanta to support a national constitutional amendment to protect marriage as a union “between one man and one woman”.  Additionally not only does Long support a national ban on same-sex marriage, but his church counsels gay members to become straight.

One can only wonder what else might happen at the Longfellows Youth Academy, a tuition-based program for young men between the ages of 13 and 18.

Just another mega evil of mega religion.

CyanogenMod 7.1.0

While loading customer firmware on a smartphone isn’t something new (I did that with my HTC Touch Pro and HTC Touch Pro 2 Windows mobile devices years ago) it is something that is very easy to do with Android handsets.

My Droid A855 (that’s the original Verizon Droid — and I actually have two) with it’s slow 600 MHz ARM processor has been running Gingerbread (2.3) for almost a year; and as of last night the handset I carry has been updated to the third build of Gingerbread.

Why?

Well, Android is far from a finished and polished product; and Froyo (2.2) which is officially supported on the phone lacks a number of features.

To take advantage of a custom ROM you first need to root your phone (which has other advantages besides just allowing you to install a custom ROM, but if you’re going to root — you definitely want a custom ROM).

Once you’ve rooted your device, you can choose between a number of different custom ROMs — I try and go for stability; and I’ve tried a number of different ROMs, CyanogenMod is the one I’ve settled on.

Also, if you purchased an HP Touchpad — CyanogenMod has an Alpha release of Android for you… that may make your tablet a great deal more usable.

CyanogenMod.com

AT&T U-Verse – Voice

AT&T offers three separate services through their U-Verse branded advance communications offering.  This post will deal with voice.

U-Verse voice isn’t traditional wire line POTS service; rather it’s a feature rich digital communication service.

When you have AT&T U-Verse voice service installed, the pair from the Telco will be routed from your MPOE to the residential gateway and then back to your home wiring (though the MPOE).  This allows you to keep all your current phones working through their existing wiring plant.

My residential gateway labels the first “POTS” port as line one and two, and has a separate jack for an auxiliary voice connection (the online account management only has options for one or two lines — but since there is an option for zero lines, there may well be an option for a third or even fourth line that simply isn’t displayed).

Remember the gateway is connected to a UPS, so you will be able to maintain voice service for some period of time after the electricity goes out — this allows for E911 during power outages (and yes, AT&T provides E911 capabilities with their U-Verse service).

AT&T currently offers two different levels on their voice plan — “Unlimited” and”250″.

The unlimited plan currently costs $35.00 in my area for the primary line, $15 for a secondary line (not including local, state, federal taxes and fees or FCC line charges); and the 250 is $25.00 for the primary line, $15 for a secondary line.

Below is what AT&T says about the plans…

AT&T U-verse Voice Unlimited
Provides unlimited calling within the U.S. and to Canada, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Northern Marianas for just $30 per month. A second line that shares minutes under the same plan can be added for another $15 per month.

AT&T U-verse Voice 250
For just $25 per month, provides 250 minutes of calling each month within the U.S. and to Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Northern Marianas and only 5¢ per minute thereafter. A second line that shares minutes under the same plan can be added for another $15 per month.

Notice the discrepancy in the price for the “Unlimited” — like I have already said, AT&T does not engender trust.

I’m guessing that other than the number of minutes of usage you get, the plans are the same.

When you get AT&T U-Verse voice you can have your current number ported (which means you can keep your current number) or have a new number assigned.  AT&T of course will charge you extra for non-published or un-listed numbers, and they don’t seems to allow you to have the number listed under an alternate name (as Bell South did).

To me, charging for not doing something is a travesty — and simply a way to make more money; remember they make money on published/listed numbers by selling your address and telephone information to marketing firms (which I believe it should be illegal for anyone to sell any information about me without my express permission and paying me the amount I deem fair — which trust me, no company could afford).

You can manage many (if not all) of the features of U-Verse voice through the Internet, and many through your TV set-top box — I don’t really know how you’d manage your voice feature if you didn’t have one (or both) of the other services.

U-Verse voice include voice mail, call forwarding (no answer, busy, safe, all); call filtering (blocking, screening, exclusive call forwarding); call waiting, do not disturb, anonymous call blocking, locate me (or what some people call follow me ring); caller id blocking, international call blocking, directory assistance blocking… they don’t seem to specifically allow blocking of premium service and third party billing (900 numbers, xxx-976 numbers, collect calls, etc).

The service also offers logs of calls (placed, received, missed) and an address book (which you can use to place calls via the Internet or TV interfaces — I have no idea if you can do it directly from a telephone handset).

I’d say it’s a fairly sophisticated number of features — more than most people will ever need or use for sure.

The “feature” I use…

Well, I block ALL calls except calls from specified numbers.  You see, since I don’t intend to keep this number I know that the only ones that will call the number got it from AT&T (not from me) — and are entities I don’t want to talk to… so I forward Google Voice calls (which I also have tight controls on) to it for the moment.

Other than that — I’ve used it to place calls (which I could have done via my cell phone using Google Voice) and send a couple faxes (which aren’t important to me — generally a company that wants me to send a fax I just laugh at and tell them to move into the new millennium).

My feeling is that the price is too high for AT&T U-Verse Voice… it should be on the level of $20 per month for unlimited service, and certainly no more than $25 per month — for 250 minutes it should be on the level of $10 per month.  Obviously AT&T seems to feel that they’re offering some type of “premium” voice service, and seem to forget that for most people if they added even $25 per month to the cellular plan they’d be well over what some companies charge for unlimited and have the convenience of a phone they can take with them.

For me, it’s a service I won’t be keeping — I added it to the order to maximize the savings and minimize the installation fee… my calculation is that I’ll have to keep it a maximum of three months and it will end up being almost a wash.

Lone Star Republic

Some times I think the one star on the Texas flag is more representative of the IQ of the average Texan than anything else… clearly though the State of Texas seems to miss the point about separation of church and state.

Last March the Texas Board of Education removed Thomas Jefferson from the curriculum of Texas schools and substituted John Calvin and Sir William Blackstone in his place to put a religious spin on the ideology of the found of this country (and many other revolutions around the world) rather than teach about Jefferson — the man who coined the phrase “separation between church and state.”

Now the State of Texas has judged many text books to have a pro-Islamic / anti-Christian tone.

Freedom of religion and freedom from religion are the fundamentals that this country was founded on; however, the Christian right understands how fragile their belief system is, and cannot take any risks that allowing individuals access to information that might enlighten their thinking and question the mis-guided beleifs the Christian right bases their bigotry and hatred on might defuse their strangle hold on backwards locations.

The really alarming aspect of the Texas Board of Education rulings is that with 4.7 million students subject to their regulations and rules text book publishers pay attention to their demands and thus Texas view points find their way into classrooms throughout the county.

It is a travesty to allow religion to be promoted in the public school system any place in this country.