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Summer Solstice 2019

June 21 2019 15:54 GMT

Happy Birthday!

Twelve years old, just entering puberty; happy birthday (or anniversary) Google!

Google Birthday Cake

Originally posted 2010-09-27 01:30:28.

Mother’s Day

A day first envisioned by Ann Jarvis to help mend the divisions of families brought on by the American Civil War and deeply rooted in anti-war and temperance.

The holiday first proclaimed by the legislature of the state of West Virginia in 1910 and followed quickly by other states. The US Congress adopted the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day on 8 May 1914 and President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation on 9 May 1914 — ninety-six years ago today.

There have been numerous events celebrating Mother’s Day before and since — but each individual celebrates the core of this day by remembering and celebrating their mother.

Originally posted 2010-05-09 02:00:12.

Time To Move On…

That would be more precisely time to move my BLOG to another hosting service.

My contract will be up with 1and1 in April, and while I’m not at the limit of my monthly transfers, it’s conceivable in the next twelve months I will be fairly close.

And while I don’t need a great deal of customer service or technical service from a hosting company, I prefer to spend my money with companies who realize that customers can take their business where it’s appreciated, and where they actually get real value for it.

At the moment the two hosting companies that appear most interesting to me are:

The two companies are actually owned by the same individual… and seem to be highly focused on customer service.  Their prices look fair (by no means the cheapest, you can after all get totally free hosting — with no advertisements as long as you’re will to follow all the rules).  More important to me is they offer a set of features I want.

My timeline is that I’ll sign up for hosting around the end of the first week of March and then use the remaining month I have service with 1and1 to move content over.  That might mean that you won’t see as many new posts next month, and of course there may be some slight instability as I move my BLOG.  My expectation is that it will go smoothly and that content will be up and running at my new hosting facility almost immediately (probably before the domains are transferred, but I can override the DNS any time) In the long run this make it much easier for me to update and maintain my sites.

If anyone has personal experience with any of these companies; or has a strong recommendation they would like to share; or has an account at one of these and will get a referral fee please feel free to contact me.

Originally posted 2009-02-21 01:00:25.

Desktop Sharing

Maybe I’ve become spoiled, but I just expect desktop sharing (remote control) to be easy and fast.

Nothing, absolutely nothing compares to Microsoft’s RDP; and virtually any Windows machine (except home editions) can be accessed remotely via RDP; and all Windows machines and Macs can access a remote Windows machine.

Apple has their own Remote Desktop Client, and it works well — but it’s far from free (OUCH, far from free).  And Apple does build in VNC into OS-X (can you say dismally slow)… but they don’t provide any Windows client.

Linux and other *nix operating system you can use an X session remotely; or VNC (zzzzzzzzzzzzz again, slow).

As a “universal” desktop sharing solution VNC isn’t horrible (and it’s certainly priced right, and there’s plenty of different ports and builds of it to choose from), but it’s old school and old technology.

I personally think it would be a great standard to have an efficient remote desktop sharing standard, that all computers (and PDAs) could use… one ring — eh, got carried away there; one client could talk to any server, and operating system vendors would only need optimize their server and their client, other operating system vendors would do the same…

Originally posted 2009-02-23 01:00:41.

A Red, Red Rose

A Red, Red Rose
by Robert Burns

O my Luve’s like a red, red rose
That’s newly sprung in June;
O my Luve’s like the melodie
That’s sweetly played in tune.

As fair art thou, my bonnie lass,
So deep in luve am I;
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
Till a’ the seas gang dry:

Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,
And the rocks melt wi’ the sun;
I will luve thee still, my dear,
While the sands o’ life shall run.

And fare thee weel, my only Luve,
And fare thee weel awhile!
And I will come again, my Luve,
Tho’ it ware ten thousand mile.

Originally posted 2017-06-15 12:00:35.

Banks spend big to sell credit cards to students

By Amy Haimerl, personal finance editor CNN
October 26, 2010: 4:27 PM ET

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — The U.S. Marines recruit college students to become one of the few, one of the proud.

Bank of America just wants their financial future.

The Charlotte, N.C.-based bank spends exponentially more money than any other bank to recruit students for credit cards.

In 2009, Bank of America unit FIA Card Services paid colleges and alumni associations $62 million for the rights to market cards to students and members, according to a report from the Federal Reserve.

The second biggest spender, Chase, dropped $13.8 million to recruit new borrowers, while U.S. Bank forked over $2.5 million.

When the Credit Card Accountability and Responsibility and Disclosure Act — better known as the CARD Act — went into effect in February, it required credit card companies to disclose how much they pay colleges for the right to set up on campuses — plus how many new borrowers it racked up. On Monday, the Federal Reserve made its first report.
College degrees that don’t pay

In total, the report showed that credit card companies spent $82.4 million to net 53,164 new student accounts.

The University of Notre Dame got the biggest payment of any school: Chase paid the school $1.8 million and in the end got 77 new borrowers. The school used the funds exclusively for financial aid, according to university spokesman Dennis Brown.

Meanwhile, Bank of America spent $1.5 million on the University of Southern California campus to sell 659 new accounts.

“If you look at how much is being paid per account, the numbers vary wildly,” says Josh Frank, senior researcher at the Center for Responsible Lending.

In pre-CARD Act year, Frank estimates that 200,000 to 600,000 new accounts were opened on college campuses and through alumni and other organizations.

“But even in a normal year,” he said, “this seems like a lot of money to pay per account. But it’s possible that they just value those accounts more highly and that they’re more profitable for them.”

One major change from the CARD Act is that students under 21 can no longer obtain a credit card without a co-signer — something that could severely limit new accounts. Credit card companies also can’t entice new borrowers through T-shirts and other giveaways — unless they are 1,000 feet (about three football fields) away from the campus.

“Anecdotally, it does seem to be a different environment on college campuses,” Frank said. “Banks are still on campus, but their presence is lower.

Chase paid the University of Notre Dame $1.8 million for the right to market credit cards on the Indiana campus.

Original article on CNN.com

Originally posted 2010-11-08 02:00:40.

GE Money Bank – Promos

I consider GE Money Bank to be a fairly low end credit card company, but they do often have attractive promotions to get you to sign up for a card… and they continue to offer promotions to get you used to using their cards.

Some of the promotions here of late — Sam’s Discover, $40 instantly off your $100 or more purchase; Wal-Mart Discover, $20 statement credit for a $100 or more purchase; eBay MasterCard 10% up to $25 back from your purchases in the first thirty days; and Chevron-Texaco VISA $10 gas credit for four transactions in the first thirty days (not clear if they need to be at a Chevron or Texaco or not).

Plus, what you start seeing around the end of your first thirty days are offers from GE Money Bank for a $10 statement credit for spending $100 or more at business other than the one the card was issued for — I just generally make my automobile insurance payment with the card, something I would do anyway — you might lose the 1% you would have gotten back on another card, but you get $10 plus whatever the GE Money Bank card bonus is for other charges!

From my experience you get two of the $10 off offers, one each of the months following your sign up — at least I have, and the only thing I charge on the cards is basically what I need to get the promo.

The downside is you’ll probably need to contact your credit card issuer and “remind” them about the promo; they’ll credit it pretty quickly after that (give them a statement period — but call after the statement the credit should have appeared on)… I won’t say the system always fails to apply the credit, but it has for me.  And there’s no reason to get testy with them, just be calm and tell them what happened (I save copies of the promos — both the initial electronic ones and the letters they send me just in case) and you might have to be sent to a supervisor — but you’ll get the credit with no problems as long as you fulfilled the terms of the promotion.

It’s easy cash — and you don’t have to use the cards after you have the money in your pocket; though watch out about accumulating too much credit for your asset level — if you’re not going to use the card, request them to lower your credit limit (or you can consider closing the account, but I would suggest you just lower the credit limit).

Originally posted 2010-12-05 02:00:33.

History of the Black Eyed Pea Tradition

The Real Story is much more interesting and has gone untold in fear that feelings would be hurt. It’s a story of war, the most brutal and bloody war, military might and power pushed upon civilians, women, children and elderly. Never seen as a war crime, this was the policy of the greatest nation on earth trying to maintain that status at all costs. An unhealed wound remains in the hearts of some people of the southern states even today; on the other hand, the policy of slavery has been an open wound that has also been slow to heal but is okay to talk about.

The story of THE BLACK EYED PEA being considered good luck relates directly back to Sherman’s Bloody March to the Sea in late 1864. It was called The Savannah Campaign and was lead by Major General William T. Sherman. The Civil War campaign began on 11/15/64 when Sherman ‘s troops marched from the captured city of Atlanta, Georgia, and ended at the port of Savannah on 12/22/1864.

When the smoke cleared, the southerners who had survived the onslaught came out of hiding. They found that the blue belly aggressors that had looted and stolen everything of value and everything you could eat including all livestock, death and destruction were everywhere. While in hiding, few had enough to eat, and starvation was now upon the survivors.

There was no international aid, no Red Cross meal trucks. The Northern army had taken everything they could carry and eaten everything they could eat. But they couldn’t take it all. The devastated people of the south found for some unknown reason that Sherman ’s bloodthirsty troops had left silos full of black eyed peas.

At the time in the north, the lowly black eyed pea was only used to feed stock. The northern troops saw it as the thing of least value. Taking grain for their horses and livestock and other crops to feed themselves, they just couldn’t take everything. So they left the black eyed peas in great quantities assuming it would be of no use to the survivors, since all the livestock it could feed had either been taken or eaten.

Southerners awoke to face a new year in this devastation and were facing massive starvation if not for the good luck of having the black eyed peas to eat. From New Years Day 1866 forward, the tradition grew to eat black eyed peas on New Year’s Day for good luck.

· Ron Perrin, Ft Worth, TX, US

Originally posted 2012-01-01 02:00:27.

Advertising

I have added side-bar and banner advertisements to my BLOG in order to offset the hosting costs.  The advertisements are supplied through Google AdSense, and public service advertisements have been enabled.

I certainly will _not_ allow any pop up (or pop behind) advertising, and I have no idea how many (if any) readers will actually click-through the advertisements; but my feeling is it’s certainly worth a try to see if it can support itself.

Originally posted 2009-12-18 01:00:25.