Entries Tagged as 'Unsolicited Commercial EMail (UCE) aka SPAM'

Does your mail provider really want to eliminate SPAM?

I’ve been actively working to stop SPAM (that’s also known as UCE – Unsolicited Commercial Email) for a very long time, and it’s great to see how many of the “free” email providers talk about preventing SPAM and provide users with filters to prevent SPAM from reaching their inbox.

But, the bottom line is, that unless you actively report SPAMmers nothing will ever really change.

Some providers (very few) actually will generate automated SPAM reports for you [that’s great, more email providers should make it that easy]; however, most will do nothing more than use an email that you mark as SPAM to refine their filters [which might prevent you from seeing the SPAM, but it doesn’t stop the SPAMmer].

The really interesting thing is that many of the “free” email providers actually inhibit you from reporting SPAM by preventing you from accessing the “raw message” (you need all the headers and the body of the email to file an abuse report with most carriers).  What’s really funny is that some of the providers who are most vocal have actually changed their web-mail interfaces to prevent you from accessing the raw message [essentially insuring that you cannot take action against a SPAMmer].

Now if you can access you email via POP3 or IMAP4 or load it into an email client using a proprietary connector (well, at least the only ones I could test) you can access the raw message and file a report; but remember, many of the free email providers don’t give you that type of access to your email unless you pay them.

What a great message… it’s OK to SPAM free email subscribers because they can’t do anything about it!

I’m not going to provide an extensive list of those providers that do and do not actually enable you to report SPAM; I’ll just mention that Yahoo! (one of the largest free email providers, but waning) doesn’t allow free subscribers to access raw message (or if they do, I certainly couldn’t figure out how); and of course Google (GMail) and Microsoft (MSN/HotMail/Live/Bing) do allow access.

One other thing to keep in mind… there’s no such thing as free email — you’re paying for it some how some way.

Originally posted 2009-08-17 01:00:04.

EMail from my domains…

As of 1 March 2010 all of my domains should have both SPF and DKIM support in order to help receiving servers verify that the email is not SPAM.

If you are having problem receiving my email, or my email is ending up in your junk folder, please contact your email provider and query them about this.

Originally posted 2010-03-30 02:00:58.

Is The Wall Street Journal a SPAMmer?

Well, at the moment that appears to be the case.

I got an email on Thanksgiving with the subject:

The Wall Street Journal. $1.99/wk. Get the REAL Bailout news…

From what appear to be a professional SPAMmer (chargecarde.com) — and I say professional SPAMmer since the return address in the email was set to my own email address, not theirs.  My SPAM filters caught the email, but I go through the SPAM on occasion just to see what unethical businesses would resort to such tactics during hard economic times.  After all, big business never really cares about the consumer or the law — they only care about what makes them money and what they can get away with.

The laws of the State of California make sending unsolicited commercial email (aka SPAM) illegal — and of course theft of service (you pay for your internet service) is illegal in every state.

As I said almost twenty years ago when the SPAM epidemic was on the rise; we must fight back, we cannot support SPAMmers or those who support SPAMmers.

Take a minute out of your day, and from a “throw away email address” write The Wall Street Journal and let them know how you feel about SPAMming and SPAMmers — here’s some email addresses for you (normally I wouldn’t include mailto links, but I have no issue with SPAMmers getting their email addresses harvested by SPAMbots).

And make sure you avoid doing business with:

The Wall Street Journal
4300 Route 1 North
South Brunswick, NJ 08852


SPUR Media Group
PO Box 99
Fortson, GA  31808

I will share any and all responses I get from The Wall Street Journal, SPUR Media Group, or any agent representing either; and will continue to consider legal action to recover damages under California Business and Professions Code Section 17538.45 and potentially Chapter 19 of the Revised Code of WA, RCW 19.190 (since I also have a legal presence there).


NOTE:  It’s been over a week since I contacted The Wall Street Journal about the email I received on their behalf; I’ve yet to get a reply, so it would appear that The Wall Street Journal intended that the email be sent and understand that they violated the law.  So in fact the Wall Street Journal is a SPAMmer.

Originally posted 2008-11-28 12:00:16.


SPF (Sender Policy Framework) and DKIM (DomainKeys Identified Mail) are two methods to help indentify email which is likely not SPAM.  SPF was originally proposed in 2003 by Meng Weng Wong and Wayne Schlitt (SPFv1 RFC4408) as an open standard (SPF is backed by the Sender Policy Framework Council); DKIM originally merged and enhanced DomainKeys from Yahoo and Identified Internet Mail from Cisco (RFC4870 superseded by RFC4871) forming an open standard (DKIM is backed by an industry consortium).

Both SPF and DKIM attempt to provide information to receiving SMTP servers about whether or not a particular email message is authentic.

SPFv1 uses a very simple approach where a domain’s DNS server provides a root level TXT record that supplies information about SMTP mail servers that are permitted to originate domain email.

DKIM uses a more complex digital signature on each message (information about which is stored in a sub-domain in domains DNS containing self-signed keys).

You can read up on the specifics of each through the reference links provided below.

SPF (Wikipedia)

Microsoft SPF Record Wizard · OpenSPF Wizard

DKIM (Wikipedia)

Originally posted 2010-03-06 02:00:56.

Federal Express is a SPAMmer

Yesterday evening I received an Unsolicited Commercial Email (UCE, aka SPAM) from Federal Express in violation of the California Professions and Business Code Section 17538.45.

Apparently Federal Express has taken to harvesting email addresses used in requesting tracking services and subscribing them to their marketing mailings lists without obtaining the permission of the owner of the email address (California law prohibits OPT-OUT policies, and requires that advertisers use OPT-IN methods).

Not only have I send a demand to Federal Expresses marketing campaign company and Federal Express demanding immediate payment of the fifty dollar fine specified by California Law; but I will no longer do business with Federal Express PERIOD.  That means I do not ship via FedEx, and I do not accept packages via FedEx, which means I don’t deal with vendors that use FedEx.

Originally posted 2009-02-19 01:00:25.

Is Adorama a SPAMmer?

At the bottom of this post are links to the first and second post I made concerning an order I’d placed with Adorama.

Yesterday I recieved an Unsolicted Commercial Email (UCE) from Adorama; apparently they felt it was quite acceptable to subscribe an email address they obtained from Amazon as part of order fulfillment to their mailing list.  While the email did contain an “unsubscribe” link, I never authorized any use of my personal information beyond the fulfilment of my order (and I just terminated the disposable email address on file with Amazon and created a new one).

I have written a complaint to Amazon; we’ll see what action they take (my guess is none, even though UCE is illegal in Washington State as well as California).

I don’t do OPT-OUT, I don’t do business with SPAMmers, and I don’t do business with businesses who support SPAMmers — so at the moment Adorama is back on my shit list, and depending on the action Amazon takes they may be on my shit list as well!

It always amazes me companies that think so little of themselves and the value of their advertisements that they need to force customers to get their junk mail, rather than provide them with the opportunity to specify their interest upfront.  Seems a consistent gauge of a bad company — they do what ever they want, why should they care if it’s legal, ethical, or good for business in the long term.



  • California Business and Professions Code Section 17538.45
  • Chapter 19 of the Revised Code of WA, RCW 19.190


Previous posts:



Adorama assures me that email addresses obtained from Amazon are not automatically subscribed to their mailing lists.  However, customer’s who place orders directly with Adorama appear to have their email addresses automatically subscribed to their mailing list.  And my address was automatically subscribed because they placed a replacement order for me as part of the fulfillment process of my Amazon order.  From my perspective subscribing any email address to a mailing list without first obtaining a customer’s permission amounts to UCE and it totally unacceptable irrespective of the fact that you include an unsubscribe link in the email — it would have been far more acceptable to include a subscribe link in the order acknowledgement or shipping notice (and allow the customer to decide).

You need to make your own decision as to whether or not Adorama’s actions are ethical (and legal in your state of residence); but for me I don’t deal with companies who feel they may do as they please with my personal and confidential information (and my email addresses are personal and confidential).

Originally posted 2009-01-21 01:00:20.

The new SPAMmer in town — Apple Computer, Inc

Last week I wanted to update my Mac Pro to the newest version of OS-X, it’s free after all…

So powered up my Mac, let it apply all the updates for the software I had on it; then I went to the App Store to download OS-X Version 10.9 “Mavericks”.

When I tried to use my Apple ID to log in, the system told me that it had been deactivated; when went through the rats maze of information I ended up needing to call Apple Support.

I got through in about two minutes, which was impressive until I was connected to a person who barely could speak intelligible English (if English was her native language I’d consider her near illiterate). After what seemed like an eternity of back and forth (the human version of the electronic rats maze I’d just been subjected to), she told me that she would not be able to re-activate my account… after that I ask to speak to her supervisor.

I don’t know how long the hold was, but it was long, and long enough to put us past the operating time for support — the phone clicked (I could tell a person had answered), and I was immediately disconnected.

Great service Apple — the only other places recently I’ve found websites as poorly done and customer service as clueless is HealthCare.gov…

Since service was now closed, and I couldn’t get another call through to Apple (I did schedule a call back for the next morning; which FYI — I never got, absolutely no record of any call attempt within an hour of the scheduled time) I decided to be creative with their recovery system.

Eventually I got a reset email (perhaps Apple’s recovery system takes a few hours to send an email — I don’t know — and I really don’t care).

I gained access to my account, changed my password as required (it indicated I couldn’t change my password to my previous password — so in fact it wasn’t that I had forgotten my credentials, the account really had been deactivated).

Finally, after several hours I was able to “purchase” Mavericks from the App Store (as an aside — what happened to the cat motif ) and start the install.  I just went to sleep, it was way later that I had expected to be up.

While it really miffed me that Apple decided to deactivate my account (no one could really tell me why) and made it so difficult for me to re-activate it (and threw a horrendous web site and clueless customer service in my face) but what really pissed me off is that Apple automatically subscribed me to their f’ing mailing lists.


I don’t want $#!+ from Apple – unless you’re giving me something to get your f’ing marketing crap I don’t want it — and I (and the laws of the State of California — where Apple is based) would classify it as SPAM.

All I can say is Wall Street isn’t the only one who’s becoming disillusioned with Apple.

Originally posted 2013-10-29 16:00:04.


Comcast consistently ranks in the top ten (almost always the top five) of companies with pathetic customer service in virtually every poll I’ve seen (they probably even do poorly in polls they sponsor LOL).

I received a unsolicited commercial email from a Comcast business customer; and I did exactly what I should do — report it to the abuse contact published in the ARIN database, and send them a plain text copy of the entire email message — including full headers (adding the word SPAM to the subject).

I got back an automated message that said I needed to provide them the headers of the email message and a link to a page that really didn’t have any useful information.

I resent the message; including all the tags that were mentioned on the page (including the one for harassment, since that was the closest thing that fit)… and I got back a message from “Fred CSAtech55” referencing case ID NA0000014230535; who tells me if I want to follow up as “Harrassment” (that’s his spelling, not mine) that I should “call Comcast Security Assurance (CSA) at 888-565-4329”; but if I want to follow it up as spam I should “then choose the opt out option that the email provides”.

I guess, poor Fred not only can’t spell, but doesn’t understand that the LAST thing you do from an unsolicited email from a company that you’ve never dealt with (and have no reason to trust) is click on one of their links.

Maybe if Comcast hired people who could spell they might get out of the top ten worst companies for customer service.  Even better, if they hired people with a clue, they might actually be able to provide reasonable customer support and be no where near the top ten worst.

Oh, and if you’re thinking that they only provide poor service when you’re not a customer — WRONG, I can tell you story after story about how pathetic their service was in San Francisco; and how much better AT&T’s service was (that should truly be scary, when a company with service as poor as AT&T can have far superior service).

Originally posted 2010-03-31 02:30:37.

Disposable EMail Addresses

DEAs = Disposable EMail Addresses; they’re useful for you to provide to a vendor so that you can track the use of the email address and delete it if you find it’s abused or chose to no long do business with whom you gave it to.

Just like Virtual Credit Card numbers give you control over payment to merchants, Disposable EMail Addresses give you control over your inbox.

It’s a great way to fight SPAM and identify SPAMmers.

If you don’t happen to own your own domain were you can create “forwarding” addresses, there are a number of web sites that provide you with the ability to create and manage DEAs — just do an internet search.  If you can’t find one, let me know and I’ll give you some pointers.

Originally posted 2008-12-19 12:00:36.

The new SPAM medium…

It looks like Facebook and Twitter and the like are the new medium of choice for unethical companies to send SPAM via…

This morning I received a message from SurfCanister via both Facebook and Twitter (I don’t have an account on either of those, and both were sent to the same [free] email address).

I don’t do business with companies that send SPAM or any sort — and it appears that neither Facebook or Twitter have created sufficient safeguards to protect the public from companies with low ethics.

Here’s a good policy for both of them:

1) A single complaint of SPAM, suspend the offender’s account for 30-days.

2) Two or more complaints of SPAM, permanently close the offender’s account.

That should put a quick end to using social media for SPAM… though it seem to me that the social media companies are not very ethical themselves, and they seem to want to encourage this type messaging.

Someone might want to point out that California has an anti-SPAM law, and both Facebook and Twitter are headquarted in California.

Originally posted 2012-06-08 09:00:56.