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The Rules of Engagement

Secretary of Defense Robert Gates is blasting Julian Assange for the release last week of some 76,000 documents his WikiLeaks site obtained from an informant relating to the “killing of thousands of children and adults” in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Mr Gates said in a Pentagon news conference:

Mr. Assange can say whatever he likes about the greater good he thinks he and his source are doing, but the truth is, they might already have on their hands the blood of some young soldier or that of an Afghan family,

Mr Assange stated:

Secretary Gates could have used his time, as other nations have done, to announce a broad inquiry into these killings. He could have announced specific criminal investigations into the deaths we have exposed. He could have announced a panel to hear the heartfelt dissent of U.S. soldiers, who know this war from the ground. He could have apologized to the Afghani people.

But he did none of these things. He decided to treat these issues and the countries affected by them with contempt. Instead of explaining how he would address these issues, he decided to announce how he would suppress them.

This behavior is unacceptable. We will not be suppressed. We will continue to expose abuses by this administration and others.

If in fact the US military is responsible for the types of conduct alleged by Mr Assange, and the Joint Chiefs and Department of Defense have knowledge of this conduct (or actually condoned or ordered it) I can certainly understand why Mr Gates would have made such remarks — and the fact that no investigation into this matter has been launched by the US would seem to indicate (once again) that the US military plays a much different game than they publicize or propagandize.

It’s clear to see why our government keeps secrets from it’s citizens — the question really is how much more have they not disclosed?

Originally posted 2010-08-06 02:00:47.

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