Entries Tagged as 'Shopping'

Amazon Advertising

I’ve removed Amazon advertising from my BLOG and web site.

Why?

Well, it’s not because I don’t shop at Amazon any longer, it’s because apparently Amazon doesn’t pay commissions to sales to the individual hosting the ads, their family, or their friends — and Amazon makes the determination (solely at their discretion) of what transactions fall in that category.

The policy is clearly stated in their agreement, it’s just something I missed (I won’t say it changed — the agreement is long enough that I could have easily missed it skimming through when I signed up).

While I feel Amazon is a reputable retailer, I see no reason why I should provide them with free advertising space when there is simply no guarantee that any link through purchases will every generate a penny to compensate for the (ugly) advertisement that always loads slowly, and uses javascript that seems to cause lags in rendering on most every browser.

I guess I’ll go with Nancy on this one “Just Say No”.

Originally posted 2010-10-01 02:00:15.

Customer Dis-Satisfaction

Last week I placed an order online for pickup at a local Sam’s Club — I’ve done this a number of times in the past, and it’s always worked exactly as advertised.

This time, it wasn’t quite as smooth.

The order process clearly indicates that you’re supposed to get a status on your order within 24-hours; after two days I called (mainly because I was making plans to drive about 60 miles each way to go to this warehouse).

A woman answered, she put me on hold — twenty minutes later (I’m not exaggerating) she came back on the line, seemed surprised that no one had answered, put me back on hold — a few moments later another woman answered the phone and said I’d have to call back tomorrow between 8:30 am and 3:30 pm.

Now, the web site also clearly indicated that I was supposed to be able to call for customer service between the hours of 8:00 am and 8:00 pm (of course — we’d already seen the web site might contain mis-information).

I wrote a “nice” little note to customer service detailing this issue; the reply I got back was a general apology that didn’t address the discrepancy between what the web site indicated was supposed to happen and what happened, or any explanation why a customer would be kept on hold for twenty minutes only to be told to call back the next day.

I’m a total loss to come up with any comment that could possibly make Sam’s Club look more pathetic than their own actions have…

Originally posted 2010-04-30 02:00:04.

Andersen Windows Doors

I decided I wanted a full view storm door for my front door to help reduce the energy loss, and I wanted to buy it this year to take advantage of the Energy Tax Credit… I looked at both Pella (Lowes) and Andersen (Home Depot)… no one in the area carries Peachtree (and I’m not sure they make storm doors).

I liked the Pella, but a couple of the features of the Andersen (screen / glass user interchangeable panel) seemed slightly more appealing.

To say I was disappointed by the perceived quality of the door is an understatement.

Below is a message I posted to Andersen via their web site.

Let me preface this by saying I’ve renovated four homes now; and I’ve always used Peachtree, Pella, or Andersen products in them — and I’ve always been extremely happy with the quality.
When I purchased a storm door for my home in Florida I looked at the Pella product at Lowes as well as the Series 4000 and 3000 at Home Depot; and I elected the Series 3000 since I was price sensitive for resale.
While I cannot complain with the overall appearance of the door I was less than happy with the quality of the construction of the door during the installation — it seemed “cheap” to put it simply.
The way the glass/screen section installs/removes (obviously far superior on the 4000, but I’m not sure I wouldn’t have been happier with the fixed window in the Pella at the same price to avoid the concern in how well the plastic clips are going to hold up in the first hurricane); also I found the door closure mechanism to have too short a throw for the door to open any where near 90 degrees (the travel only allows about 80 degrees).
Additionally, the Home Depot employee informed me that the Kwikset lock set for the door would run around $25 — while I haven’t called either Home Depot to check on a special order or Andersen to confirm the price yet, I just find that price point to be totally ridiculous.
I can’t say I won’t consider Andersen products in the future — but this door doesn’t even slightly resemble the quality I expected (and enjoyed in the past) from Andersen…
The only positive thing I find about the door is the lifetime warranty — something I (unfortunately) expect will be used over and over and over.
I’m sure that disappointing customers isn’t your goal; but I felt it was important to share my experience and my lack of satisfaction.

Andersen Corporation
100 Fourth Avenue North
Bayport, MN 55003-1096

888-888-7020
651-264-5150

http://www.andersenwindows.com/

Originally posted 2010-11-11 02:00:00.

Apple Apps Only???

WTF is it with businesses that have only Apple iOS Apps?  Hello, Open Handset Alliance (Android) devices account for nearly 60% of all smartphones / tablets shipped… iOS accounts for less than 20% (only slightly more than Windows smartphones / tablets)… why on Earth would a business make a decision to provide a service to far less than a quarter their potential customers and ignore over half of them???

Sure, I understand that Apple exists mainly because they’re trendy — but for businesses it’s not about being kewl, it’s about money in the bank.

Maybe what these businesses that choose to ignore me and those who choose Android need to see are people choosing to ignore them…

Originally posted 2013-05-24 16:00:38.

Amazon Prices

Generally I’m very happy with shopping on Amazon (though I tend to avoid merchants in the Amazon Market Place), however…

Last month I was looking at some garden implements, and I found a Corona Clipper Model RK62061; well built, good reviews but Amazon was charging $27.63 for the item (free shipping) and indicating that the manufacturer’s suggested retail price was $29.99.

Well, I went over to Corona Clipper’s web site to check out additional information on the RK62061, and found that they had an online store — so I clicked on the RK62061 (it was a little bit of work to find the exact item, they have a rather extensive catalog)… but when I did, I found that the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (and the price that Corona Clipper would charge from their own store) was $16.40.

I was more than a little disturbed that Amazon was indicating that the manufacturer’s suggested retail price was nearly twice what it was in fact being listed for on the manufacturer’s web site (pretty clear who I’m going to believe on this).

I then checked out the shipping rates on Corona Clipper — $5.95; so even after shipping Corona Clipper was nearly 30% less than Amazon.

I pointed out to Amazon that there was an obvious error in their listing — that the manufacturer’s suggested retail price was almost half what they indicated.

They sent back a lame response about a DVD and not having any price match policy (obviously sent by a poorly done automated system)… obviously from a company that has questionable ethics and questionable customer service.

My advice — when Amazon benefits you, but from them — but ALWAYS double check the information they provide…

Obviously the State of Washington has rather different laws regarding fraudulent advertising or perhaps it’s just that Jeffrey Preston Bezos feels his company is above the law.

Originally posted 2010-04-09 02:00:53.

Bed Bath and Beyond

I can tell you what the Beyond is in their name… that would be their service.

First, I’m not much for “assemble yourself” furniture… I prefer well made, solid wood furniture (which generally means I buy turn of the century — that would be circa 1900; and have no problem paying for it).

Unfortunately I wanted a piece of furniture for my bath room, and I wasn’t having much luck finding an older piece (I guess bath room furniture wasn’t very popular 100 years ago), so I looked around a found a couple places that had at least solid wood frame furniture that seemed relatively well made.

The local Bed Bath and Beyond didn’t stock the piece I was interested in (they had a similar piece, and another piece in that collection — but the piece I wanted was being discontinued — figures), so I had to order it (the upside was that it was about $50 less).

I placed the order, got a confirmation, and a shipment notice the next business day (all of which I expect from any decent e-Tailer).

The piece arrived, and the UPS person delivered it and for the most part the box looked like it was in pretty good shape, two of the corners were a little dented — but no reason to assume that item was damaged.

As I started to assemble the piece, I noted that one side piece had a very small chip, but I felt that it probably wouldn’t be noticed, and it would be easy to touch up.  Then I got to the top — damn — the back right corner must have been right where one of the packages corners took a hit, it was slightly deformed, and with light shining on it it was going to stick out like a sore thumb.

I wasn’t sure what to do, but I figured I’d call customer service before I continued the assembly.

I called, and the hold time was much longer than I would have liked — and the annoying message that I could leave a message (over and over) was beginning to get on my nerves just as an agent picked up my call.

She was polite, and immediately made what sounded to be a genuine apology for the inconvenience.  She would have been happy to have the warehouse ship me both parts, but as I told here I’d probably cause more damage replacing the side piece, and really only the top was a “must replace”.

I haven’t seen the confirmation of shipment of the replacement parts yet — but I have every confidence that there won’t be any issues…

Now, we’ll see if the local store is as easy to deal with doing a return of another item.

Originally posted 2009-08-06 01:00:42.

Lowes Ceiling Fan Followup

I got two calls from the local Lowes store regarding my ceiling fan issue, and I have to say I was quite impressed by how efficiently the local store handled the issue.

They had a replacement fan ready for me when I stopped by, and they actually had no problem just putting the purchase price of the fan onto a gift card so that I could select a different model.

I would say the greatest failing of Lowes in this entire incident is that the corporate offices has put together an online system that poorly reflects on the ability of local Lowes management to handle problems; perhaps the best thing for Lowes to do is simply forward online request to local management and not ever try and resolve issues at a corporate level…

NOTE:  I actually purchased a Hunter ceiling fan at The Home Depot since Lowes didn’t have a suitable replacement fan in a brand I trusted.  The Hunter fan’s motor is easily three times the weight of the Harbor Breeze’s motor, and like the other Hunter fans I have (and have had in the past) it’s totally silent (and was much easier to install).

Originally posted 2009-10-28 01:00:12.

Just Say No To Adorama

I wanted to buy a couple filters for my camera, and I’m fairly picky about just what brand of filter goes on my lens.  My preference is Sunpak and Quantaray (Quantaray is made by Hoya) — both Japanese manufactured, and solid glass construction with multi-coats.

I looked up prices, and found that Amazon had a good price on a Sunpak kit with both of the filters I wanted in it; so I looked at the buy options, Amazon was a little more expensive than a couple of the other vendors they listed, but with free shipping it was just about a wash and I prefer to deal with Amazon and avoid Amazon merchants.  The only problem was, Amazon was out of stock, and of course no way to know how long it would take for them to get stock.

I guess I just wanted to be done with it, so I clicked on the link to buy the item I wanted from Adorama

I have to say,  Adorama was fairly quick about shipping out the filters, and their shipping price was fair; but when I opened the bubble envelope inside was a clear plastic bag with an invoice and two Tiffen filters rather than two Sunpak filters.

  • NOTE:  Tiffen is US made, and they may be believe their manufacturing technology is great; but I’ll pass on it.

At first I thought I’d made a mistake and ordered the wrong thing; but then I noticed I could read the itemized invoice through the plastic bag.  First line on the invoice was a Sunpak filter kit with the Sunpak number; the next line said kit consists of (hmm… Sunpak sells the two lens in a package, the vendor doesn’t assemble it — but I’d have no problem taking two individually packaged Sunpak filters for the price of the kit, provided they were the Sunpak filters that were supposed to be in the kit); the next two lines listed out Tiffen filters, descriptions, and part numbers.

So much for even thinking I’d made a mistake, and so much for even thinking it might have been human error on Adorama’s side.

I don’t have a problem with a vendor being out of stock of an item I ordered; and I don’t have any problem with them substituting an equivalent or better item (with my permission — I get to make the call whether it’s equivalent or better); or advising me that there will be a delay; or refunding my money.  The key really is the vendor needs to contact me and advise me of the situation and the options they’re comfortable with. 

What Adorama did was bait-and-switch; only they didn’t have me participate in the switch so it was just out right fraud.

Personally I don’t do business with companies who think so little of their customers that they believe they can do what ever they want when ever they want…

I, of course, contacted Adorama (still no reply — and we’re moving in on a week).  I contacted Amazon, I’ve actually exchanged email with them twice on this matter, and they’ve ask that I wait until after Monday before they will take any action.  And I’ve contacted my credit card company; who were appalled at a merchant doing what I told them they had done, so I don’t expect having any problems getting a favorable resolution to this.

One of the reasons I felt it would be “OK” to purchase from Adorama (breaking my policy of avoiding Amazon merchants when ever possible) was that Ken Rockwell, who maintains a great web site on photography (and other things) had listed Adorma on his site as a vendor, and I had hoped that they had the same high standards as Ken (he also lists Amazon, B&H Photo Video Pro Audio, J&R, and Ritz Camera /Wolf Camera — all of which I tend to trust).

I’ve ordered a set of Sunpak filters from Amazon, and I’ll just be content to wait until they get them in stock, which will probably happen before Adorama sends me a pre-paid return shipping label.

__________
 
For your reference, I’ve include links to the two Japanese filter manufacturers I prefer (again I find Hoya branded filters expensive, and you can get the exact same product at a lower price by buying a store or generic brand that’s made by Hoya). 
 

__________

NOTE:

Please read the complete follow up before making any decisions on Adorama.

Originally posted 2009-01-04 12:00:16.

Adorama – Rebuttal

The following:

  • is a rebuttal from Adorama Camera Customer Service.
  • is included here as provided to me by Adorama unchanged (with the exception that an email address was removed from the signature block to prevent harvesting).
  • is Adorama’s perspective (not necessarily mine).

Links to my original posts are included at the end.

Roger stated on his blog that ‘I had received an Unsolicited Commercial Email (UCE) from Adorama” and that “…apparently they felt it was quite acceptable to subscribe an email address they obtained from Amazon”

Following correspondence with an Adorama representative, Roger now appreciates that his statement “…they felt it was quite acceptable” was an incorrect assumption on his part as it had no basis in fact. It was also incorrect to assume and suggest that Adorama sends Unsolicited Commercial Emails to customers that bought goods from Adorama through Amazon.

Adorama has confirmed to Roger that email addresses obtained from Amazon are not automatically subscribed to our mailing lists. His address was automatically subscribed because Adorama placed a replacement order directly for him, as part of the fulfillment process of his Amazon order.

Adorama provided Roger with assurances not only of our strict policy not to send commercial emails to Amazon customers, but also provided information that reassures him that he was incorrect to make unsubstantiated allegations regarding his perception of the attitude of Adorama staff, based upon his assumptions – which he now knows to be without substance.

Adorama also provided Roger with the name of Director of Email Campaigns along with the raw candid conversation that clarifies without doubt his commitment to Adorama customers, and his overwhelming concern that he mistakenly emailed an Amazon customer.

Roger stated previously that this action by Adorama “Seems a consistent gauge of a bad company – they do what ever they want, why should they care if it’s legal, ethical….” It is clear from the conversation referred to above, and the email exchanges with Helen Oster, the Adorama Camera Customer Service Ambassador, that Adorama employees do not, in fact, deserve the accusations he directed at them in relation to how we feel about our customers.

We hope that this public acknowledgement that Roger made a mistake, will clarify that he does appreciate that data processing errors are just that – errors; they are not deliberate and certainly don’t reflect personality. In retrospect, it would be accurate to state that the words on Roger’s blog were controlled by him and a true reflection of how he was feeling towards Adorama at the time. He is fully aware that respect works both ways; he demands respect for his Inbox therefore he agrees that it is not asking a lot in return to ask him to respect the feelings of the Adorama employees, rather than attributing ideas and attitudes that are remote and alien to their consciousness.

Roger now understands that at Adorama, we invest genuine effort and goodwill in every email sent, in an effort to ensure that we are not offending any customer,

Roger stated in his blog that “From my perspective subscribing any email address to a mailing list without first obtaining a customer’s permission amounts to UCE and it totally unacceptable irrespective of the fact that you include an unsubscribe link in the email”

Adorama shares that opinion, which is why when a customer checks out on the website, he or she has the option to decide whether or not to receive marketing emails from us. Currently, the opt-in option is checked by default. However, the email marketing team have already discussed and agreed that this is not satisfactory, and changes are in an advanced stage of planning.

The new check out will feature three options:

1. Opt-in to Adorama marketing emails

2. No Adorama marketing emails, ever

3. Defer the decision until Adorama has followed-up post check-out, with options that provide control to the customer over what to receive and what not to receive, together with additional information describing the benefits of each category of marketing email.

This applies to the orders originating on the Adorama website, which takes the greater share of our orders. For ‘phone orders, the opt-in/opt-out is verbal on the ‘phone; there is a field where sales associates must indicate Y/N.

Helen Oster

Adorama Camera Customer Service Ambassador

My previous BLOG posts concerning Adorma:

Originally posted 2009-02-02 01:00:48.

eBay & PayPal – Poster Children for Everything Wrong With Corporate America

Several years ago eBay was won litigation in California over whether or not they were an “auction house” — eBay asserted they were a venue, not an auction house.  Why did eBay care?  Well, in California an auction house must stand behind the authenticity of the items it auctions.

While I have no problem with eBay calling themselves a venue — I do have a problem with them continuing to use the word “auction” all over their site.  You’re either a venue or an auction site… one or the other; oh that’s right, you’re a big company and don’t seem to have any problem skirting the law — you’ve got money, you probably feel you don’t have to play by the same rules.

And then there’s PayPal — clearly a financial institution, and clearly should be subject to all the regulations of financial institutions…

Oh yeah, they’re owned by eBay — they have money…

And to make it worse, eBay / PayPal are monopolies.

I’m tired of big companies that feel they need not care about the letter or the intent of the law; that feel they are free to confuse and mislead consumers; that are greedy and have no heart or soul.

I talk with my money, and I don’t spend my money at places I don’t support… each of you need to make your own minds up and decide what the cost of supporting tyranny in the world really is — or is it just something you talk about?

Originally posted 2008-11-06 12:00:21.