Entries Tagged as 'Politics'

May Day

May Day, or the 1st of May (not the call for help) is celebrated to mark several different events in many parts of the world.

In much of the world it is synonymous with International Workers’ Day or Labour Day, but the oldest references to May Day is related to the Celtic festival of Beltane and the Germanic festival of Walpurgis Night.

While the basis of the celebration might be pagan, the Christians usurped it (as they did with many others)  to be more in keeping with the teachings of their church.

Whether your interest is in International Workers’ Day or Labour Day or the Celtic festival of Beltane or the Germanic festival of Walpurgis Night or pagan/neopagan festivals such as Samhain…

Take a moment and read up on the many facets of May Day… and take a moment to celebrate the day in any and every way you choose!

But for me, May Day marks the end of Winter and the start of Spring.

May Day on Wikipedia


May Day

Originally posted 2010-05-01 02:00:53.

Stuck in the toilet…

If the economy stays stuck in the toilet, I have a shot at beating Obama...
by Mike Luckovich

Originally posted 2011-07-06 02:00:52.

Legalizing Pot

A government report this past week showed that illegal drug use was up… and immediately the media latches on blaming medical marijuana as being the cause.

Hello… it’s a down economy; and when the economy is bad, and people are out of work, drug use typically increases.

I’m not entirely sure that marijuana should be legalized; I’m more for supporting federal initiatives that require access to alcohol and tobacco to require a doctor’s prescription and making them available only at regulated dispensaries.

After all, the government knew years ago that both tobacco and alcohol were far worse than marijuana… and if there’s any gateway drugs we should be concerned with it’s alcohol and tobacco — after all, I’m willing to bet that an incredibly large number of illegal drug users use or used alcohol and/or tobacco first.

Get a grip America — the double standard in dealing with “harmful” substances is part of the problem… and guess what, prohibition failed (miserably); just read what wealthiest supporters of prohibition said after it was repealed:

When Prohibition was introduced, I hoped that it would be widely supported by public opinion and the day would soon come when the evil effects of alcohol would be recognized. I have slowly and reluctantly come to believe that this has not been the result. Instead, drinking has generally increased; the speakeasy has replaced the saloon; a vast army of lawbreakers has appeared; many of our best citizens have openly ignored Prohibition; respect for the law has been greatly lessened; and crime has increased to a level never seen before.
· John D Rockefeller, Jr

Originally posted 2010-09-19 02:00:48.

For the good of the many…

BART shutdown power to cellular antennas in and around BART stations in order to prevent individuals from using social media to organize a protest.

BART said basically it weighed the rights and freedoms all American expect against the potential threat to public safety.

How many times have autocrats and dictators used a similar statement to defend their actions in the past.

Freedom has costs associated with it; and unfortunately the right to protest is a fundamental tenant of American society… suppressing that right, even if there is a perceived threat of something possibly going wrong, does harm to all of us.

Since 9/11 this country has been headed down a dangerous road — essential freedoms have been compromised, and now public entities are taking action without any judicial review that severely impact public freedoms.

I say it’s time this stops before we find that “we” didn’t win the Cold War, we simply became the enemy.


Cell Service Shutdown Raises Free Speech Questions by Carrie Johnson NPR.org

Originally posted 2011-08-16 02:00:36.

Boehner makes sense

House Minority Leader John Boehner (Republican) stated that he would support President Barack Obama’s proposal to renew the expiring Bush tax cuts only for those making less than $250,000 if it were his only option.

The Republicans in both the House and Senate were quick to add fuel to the fire and turn up the volume on the rhetoric about fiscal responsibility, watching out for the little guy, etc, etc, etc — and saying that they believe the tax cuts should be extended for all Americans.

Do people making over $250,000 really need a tax cut?

Seems to me that they’re doing OK; much better than the average American is fairing in this economic crisis (I won’t call it a recession because it certainly seems much more like a depression — so we’ll leave it a crisis).

The bottom line is we have to pay our bills — and as the Republicans are complaining about the government has been spending out of control… but what they don’t remind you is that George W Bush is responsible for the out of control spending; Barrack Obama and his administration haven’t spent anywhere near as much as George W Bush — and a large amount of what is being spent now is being spent on a war that George W Bush threw this country into (and lied to get the support for it).

I’m well aware that it’s a tenant of Socialism that we take more from those who can afford it, and give it to those who need it…

From each according to his ability, to each according to his need
· Karl Marx, 1875 Critique of the Gotha Program

But in point of fact the American income tax structure has always been based on a progressive tax (those who earn more, pay more); except what happens now is that those who earn enough can avoid taxes by taking advantage of the loop holes the complex laws afford them.

We really need to rework the tax system so that it’s more equitable across the board; and those who benefit greatly from society pay their fair share of the costs of supporting society… but until then, I think getting $700B from those who earn more than a quarter million dollars per year is a necessary step to putting this country back on the road to stability.

Originally posted 2010-09-15 02:00:52.

The Rules of Engagement

Secretary of Defense Robert Gates is blasting Julian Assange for the release last week of some 76,000 documents his WikiLeaks site obtained from an informant relating to the “killing of thousands of children and adults” in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Mr Gates said in a Pentagon news conference:

Mr. Assange can say whatever he likes about the greater good he thinks he and his source are doing, but the truth is, they might already have on their hands the blood of some young soldier or that of an Afghan family,

Mr Assange stated:

Secretary Gates could have used his time, as other nations have done, to announce a broad inquiry into these killings. He could have announced specific criminal investigations into the deaths we have exposed. He could have announced a panel to hear the heartfelt dissent of U.S. soldiers, who know this war from the ground. He could have apologized to the Afghani people.

But he did none of these things. He decided to treat these issues and the countries affected by them with contempt. Instead of explaining how he would address these issues, he decided to announce how he would suppress them.

This behavior is unacceptable. We will not be suppressed. We will continue to expose abuses by this administration and others.

If in fact the US military is responsible for the types of conduct alleged by Mr Assange, and the Joint Chiefs and Department of Defense have knowledge of this conduct (or actually condoned or ordered it) I can certainly understand why Mr Gates would have made such remarks — and the fact that no investigation into this matter has been launched by the US would seem to indicate (once again) that the US military plays a much different game than they publicize or propagandize.

It’s clear to see why our government keeps secrets from it’s citizens — the question really is how much more have they not disclosed?

Originally posted 2010-08-06 02:00:47.

The Midnight Ride of Sarah Palin

Apparently Sarah Palin took an opportunity to display her knowledge of both American history and American literature in New England while talking to reporters — referring to Paul Revere she said:

warned the British that they weren’t going to be taking away our arms by ringing those bells and making sure as he’s riding his horse through town to send those warning shots and bells that we were going to be secure and we were going to be free.

Following that on Fox News she continued on the previous topic with:

You know what? I didn’t mess up about Paul Revere. Here is what Paul Revere did. He warned the Americans that the British were coming, the British were coming, and they were going to try to take our arms and we got to make sure that we were protecting ourselves and shoring up all of ammunitions and our firearms so that they couldn’t take it.

But remember that the British had already been there, many soldiers for seven years in that area. And part of Paul Revere’s ride — and it wasn’t just one ride — he was a courier, he was a messenger. Part of his ride was to warn the British that we’re already there. That, hey, you’re not going to succeed. You’re not going to take American arms. You are not going to beat our own well-armed persons, individual, private militia that we have. He did warn the British. And in a shout-out, gotcha type of question that was asked of me, I answered candidly. And I know my American history.

You can read for yourself a letter from Paul Revere himself provided by the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Letter from Paul Revere to Jeremy Belknap, circa 1798

· Page 1

Dear Sir,

Having a little leisure, I wish to fullfill my
promise, of giving you some facts, and Anecdotes, prior to
the Battle of Lexington, which I do not remember to have seen
in any history of the American Revolution.

In the year 1773 I was imployed by the Select men of the
Town of Boston to carry the Account of the Destruction of the
Tea to New-York; and afterwards, 1774, to Carry their dispatches to
New-York and Philadelphia for Calling a Congress; and afterwards to
Congress, several times.* [This asterisk points to a note in the left margin written by Jeremy Belknap: “Let the narrative begin here.” ] In the Fall of 1774 & Winter of 1775 I was
one of upwards of thirty, cheifly mechanics, who formed our selves in to a Committee
for the purpose of watching the Movements of the British Soldiers,
and gaining every intelegence of the movements of the Tories. We
held our meetings at the Green-Dragon Tavern. We were so carefull that
our meetings should be kept Secret; that every time we met, every
person swore upon the Bible, that they would not discover any of
our transactions, But to Messrs. Hancock, Adams, Doctors Warren, Church,
& one or two more. About November, when things began to grow
Serious, a Gentleman who had Conections with the Tory party, but was
a Whig at heart, aquainted me, that our meetings were discovered, &
mentioned the identical words that were spoken among us the Night
before. We did not then distrust Dr. Church, but supposed it must be
some one among us. We removed to another place, which we
thought was more secure: but here we found that all our transactions
were communicated to Governor Gage. (This came to me through the
then Secretary Flucker; He told it to the Gentleman mentioned above). It was
then a common opinion, that there was a Traytor in the provincial Con
gress, & that Gage was posessed of all their Secrets. (Church was a member
of that Congress for Boston.) In the Winter, towards the Spring, we fre-
quently took Turns, two and two, to Watch the Soldiers, By patroling
the Streets all night. The Saturday Night preceding the 19th of April, about 12
oClock at Night, the Boats belonging to the Transports were all
launched, & carried under the Sterns of the Men of War. (They had been
previously hauld up & repaired). We likewise found that the Grenadiers
and light Infantry were all taken off duty.

· Page 2

From these movements, we expected something serious was [to] be transacted. On Tuesday evening, the 18th, it was observed, that a number
of Soldiers were marching towards the bottom of the Common.
About 10 o’Clock, Dr. Warren Sent in great haste for me, and beged
that I would imediately Set off for Lexington, where Messrs. Hancock
& Adams were, and acquaint them of the Movement, and that it was
thought they were the objets. When I got to Dr. Warren’s house, I found
he had sent an express by land to Lexington – a Mr. Wm. Daws.
The Sunday before, by desire of Dr. Warren, I had been to Lexington, to Mess. Hancock and Adams, who were at the Rev. Mr. Clark’s. I returned
at Night thro Charlestown; there I agreed with a Col. Conant, & some other Gentle
men, in Charleston, that if the British went out by Water,
we would shew two Lanthorns in the North Church Steeple;
& if by Land, one, as a Signal; for we were aprehensive it would be di
ficult to Cross the Charles River, or git over Boston neck. I left Dr. Warrens, called
upon a friend, and desired him to make the Signals. I then
went Home, took my Boots and Surtout, and went to the North part of the Town, where
I had kept a Boat; two friends rowed me across Charles River,
a little to the eastward where the Somerset Man of
War lay. It was then young flood, the Ship was winding, &
the moon was Rising. They landed me on Charlestown
side. When I got into Town, I met Col. Conant, & several others;
they said they had seen our signals. I told them what was
Acting, & went to git me a Horse; I got a Horse of Deacon
Larkin. While the Horse was preparing, Richard Devens, Esq.
who was one of the Committee of Safty, came to me, & told me, that he came down the Road from
Lexington, after Sundown, that evening; that He met ten British Officers, all
well mounted, & armed, going up the Road. I set off upon a very
good Horse; it was then about 11 o’Clock, & very pleasant. After I
had passed Charlestown Neck, & got nearly opposite where Mark was
hung in chains, I saw two men on Horse back, under a Tree.
When I got near them, I discovered they were British officer.
One tryed to git a head of Me, & the other to take me. I turned
my Horse very quick, & Galloped towards Charlestown neck,
and then pushed for the Medford Road. The one who chased
me, endeavoring to Cut me off, got into a Clay pond, near
where the new Tavern is now built. I got clear of him,

· Page 3

and went thro Medford, over the Bridge, & up to Menotomy.
In Medford, I awaked the Captain of the Minute men; & after
that, I alarmed almost every House, till I got to Lexington.
I found Mrs. Messrs. Hancock & Adams at the Rev. Mr. Clark’s; I told
them my errand, and inquired for Mr. Daws; they said he had
not been there; I related the story of the two officers, &
supposed that He must have been stopped, as he ought to
have been there before me. After I had been there about half
an Hour, Mr. Daws came; after we refreshid our selves, we and set off
for Concord, to secure the Stores, &c. there. We were overtaken by a young Docter Prescot,
whom we found to be a high Son of Liberty. I told them
of the ten officers that Mr. Devens mett, and that it was pro-
bable we might be stoped before we got to Concord; for
I supposed that after Night, they divided them selves, and that
two of them had fixed themselves in such passages as were
most likely to stop any intelegence going to Concord.
I likewise mentioned, that we had better allarm all the In-
habitents till we got to Concord; the young Doctor much ap-
proved of it, and said, he would stop with either of us, for the
people between that & Concord knew him, & would give the
more credit to what we said. We had got nearly half way.
Mr Daws & the Doctor stoped to allarm the people of a House:
I was about one hundred Rod a head, when I saw two men,
in nearly the same situation as those officer were, near
Charlestown. I called for the Doctor & Daws to come up; –
were two & we would have them in an Instant I was
surrounded by four; – they had placed themselves in a Straight
Road, that inclined each way; they had taken down a pair of
Barrs on the North side of the Road, & two of them were under
a tree in the pasture. The Docter being foremost, he came up;
and we tryed to git past them; but they being armed with pis-
tols & swords, they forced us in to the pasture; -the Docter jum-
ped his Horse over a low Stone wall, and got to Concord.

· Page 4

I observed a Wood at a Small distance, & made for that.
When I got there, out Started Six officers, on Horse back,
and orderd me to dismount;-one of them, who appeared
to have the command, examined me, where I came from,
& what my Name Was? I told him. it was Revere, he as-
ked if it was Paul? I told him yes He asked me if
I was an express? I answered in the afirmative. He
demanded what time I left Boston? I told him; and
aded, that their troops had catched aground in passing the River,
and that There would be five hundred Americans there
in a short time, for I had alarmed the Country all the way up.
He imediately rode towards those who stoppd us,
when all five of them came down upon a full gallop;
one of them, whom I afterwards found to be Major
Mitchel, of the 5th Regiment, Clapped his pistol to my head, called me by name,
& told me he was going to ask me some questions, & if I
did not give him true answers, he would blow my
brains out. He then asked me similar questions to those
above. He then orderd me to mount my Horse, after
searching me for arms. He then orderd them to advance,
& to lead me in front. When we got to the Road, they
turned down towards Lexington. When we had got about one
Mile, the Major Rode up to the officer that was leading
me, & told him to give me to the Sergeant. As soon as
he took me, the Major orderd him, if I attempted to
run, or any body insulted them, to blow my brains out.
We rode till we got near Lexington Meeting-house,
when the Militia fired a Voley of Guns, which ap-
peared to alarm them very much. The Major inqui-
red of me how far it was to Cambridge, and if there were
any other Road? After some consultation, the Major

· Page 5

Major Rode up to the Sargent, & asked if his Horse
was tired? He told answered him, he was – (He was a Sargent
of Grenadiers, and had a small Horse) – then, said He,
take that man’s Horse. I dismounted, & the Sargent
mounted my Horse, when they all rode towards
Lexington Meeting-House. I went across
the Burying-ground, & some pastures, & came to the Revd. Mr. Clark’s
House, where I found Messrs. Hancok & Adams. I told them of
my treatment, & they concluded to go from that House
to wards Woburn. I went with them, & a Mr. Lowell,
who was a Clerk to Mr. Hancock. When we got to the
House where they intended to stop, Mr. Lowell & I my self returned to
Mr. Clark’s, to find what was going on. When we got
there, an elderly man came in; he said he had just come from
the Tavern, that a Man had come from Boston, who said
there were no British troops coming. Mr. Lowell & my
self went towards the Tavern, when we met a Man
on a full gallop, who told us the Troops were coming
up the Rocks. We afterwards met another, who said
they were close by. Mr. Lowell asked me to go to the
Tavern with him, to a Bit a Trunk of papers belonging to Mr. Hancock. We
went up Chamber; & while we were giting the Trunk,
we saw the British very near, upon a full March.
We hurried to wards Mr. Clark’s House. In our way,
we passed through the Militia. There were about 50.
When we had got about 100 Yards from the meeting-House the British Troops
appeard on both Sides of the Meeting-House. In their

· Page 6

In their Front was an Officer on Horse back. They made a
Short Halt; when I saw, & heard, a Gun fired, which appeared
to be a Pistol. Then I could distinguish two Guns, & then
a Continual roar of Musquetry; When we made off with the Trunk.

As I have mentioned Dr. Church, perhaps it might not
be disagreeable to mention some Matters of my own
knowledge, respecting Him. He appeared to be a high
son of Liberty. He frequented all the places where they met,
Was incouraged by all the leaders of the Sons of Liberty,
& it appeared he was respected by them, though I knew that
Dr. Warren had not the greatest affection for him. He was esteemed
a very capable writer, especially in verese; and as the Whig party
needed every Strenght, they feared, as well as courted Him.
Though it was known, that some of the Liberty Songs, which We
composed, were parodized by him, in favor of the British,
yet none dare charge him with it. I was a constant &
critical observer of him, and I must say, that I never thought
Him a man of Principle; and I doubted much in my own
mind, wether He was a real Whig. I knew that He kept
company with a Capt. Price, a half-pay British officer, & that
He frequently dined with him, & Robinson, one of the Commissi
-oners. I know that one of his intimate aquaintances asked him
why he was so often with Robinson and Price? His answer was, that He kept Company
with them on purpose to find out their plans. The day after
the Battle of Lexington, I came across met him in Cambridge, when He shew
me some blood on his stocking, which he said spirted on
him from a Man who was killed near him, as he was urging
the Militia on. I well remember, that I argued with my
self, if a Man will risque his life in a Cause, he must be
a Friend to that cause; & I never suspected him after, till He was
charged with being a Traytor.

· Page 7

The same day I met Dr. Warren. He was President of the
Committee of Safety. He engaged me as a Messinger, to do
the out of doors business for that committee; which gave
me an opportunity of being frequently with them.
The Friday evening after, about sun set, I was sitting with
some, or near all that Committee, in their room, which was
at Mr. Hastings’s House at Cambridge. Dr. Church, all at once,
started up – Dr. Warren, said He, I am determined to go into
Boston tomorrow – (it set them all a stairing) – Dr. Warren
replyed, Are you serious, Dr. Church? they will Hang you
if they catch you in Boston. He replyed, I am serious, and am
determined to go at all adventures. After a considerable
conversation, Dr. Warren said, If you are determined, let us
make some business for you. They agreed that he should
go to Bit medicine for their & our Wounded officers. He
went the next morning; & I think he came back on Sunday
evening. After He had told the Committee how things were,
I took him a side, & inquired particularly how they treated
him? he said, that as soon as he got to their lines on the Boston Neck,
they made him a prisoner, & carried him to General Gage, where He
was examined, & then He was sent to Gould’s Barracks, & was
not suffered to go home but once.
After He was taken up, for holding a Correspondence with the Brittish, I came a Cross Deacon
Caleb Davis;-we entred into Conversation about Him;-He told
me, that the morning Church went into Boston, He (Davis) received
a Bilet for General Gage-(he then did not know that Church was
in Town)-When he got to the General’s House, he was told, the General
could not be spoke with, that He was in private with a Gentle
man; that He waited near half an Hour,-When General Gage &
Dr. Church came out of a Room, discoursing together, like

· Page 8

like persons who had been long aquainted. He ap
-peared to be quite surprized at seeing Deacon Davis
there; that he (Church) went where he pleased, while
in Boston, only a Major Caine, one of Gage’s Aids, went with him. I was
told by another person whom I could depend upon, that he saw Church go in to General
Gage’s House, at the above time; that He got out of the Chaise
and went up the steps more like a Man that was aquainted,
than a prisoner. Sometime after, perhaps a Year or two, I fell
in company with a Gentleman who studied with
Church -in discoursing about him, I related what I have men
tioned above; He said, He did not doubt that He was in the
Interest of the Brittish; & that it was He who informed Gen. Gage
That he knew for Certain, that a Short time before the Battle of Lexing
ton, (for He then lived with Him, & took Care of his Business & Books)
He had no money by him, and was much drove for money; that
all at once, He had several Hundred New Brittish Guineas;
and that He thought at the time, where they came from.

Thus, Sir, I have endeavoured to give you a
Short detail of some matters, of which perhaps no person but
my self have have documents, or knowledge. I have men
tioned some names which you are aquainted with: I wish
you would Ask them, if they can remember the Circumstances
I alude to.

I am, Sir, with every Sentment
of esteem,
Your Humble Servant,
Paul Revere

Or you might want to refer to the poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Paul Revere's Ride
Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, “If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,–
One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm.”

Then he said “Good-night!” and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend through alley and street
Wanders and watches, with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the sombre rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,–
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town
And the moonlight flowing over all.

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel’s tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, “All is well!”
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay,–
A line of black that bends and floats
On the rising tide like a bridge of boats.

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse’s side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry’s height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.

A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer’s dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,—
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
>From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,—
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.
· Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)

Or see what The Paul Reverse House has to say…

Originally posted 2011-06-06 02:00:49.

Leaks

Wikileaks is at it again, they’re going to publish communications from the US Department of State.

I’m outraged…

No, no, I’m not the least bit outraged at Wikileaks; I’m outraged at the childish actions by governments around the world.

In the United States, we have a government “of the people, for the people, and by the people” which I read as any and every piece of information possessed by the United States government belongs to me, and I have a right to unfettered access.

How can citizens of the United States be expected to make good decisions in choosing those who will lead them if they’re not given access to all the information they desire?

It’s a travesty that our government conducts covert operations against not only perceived threats, but against it’s own people.

The time has come to make major changes… the time has come that the governments of the world stop hiding their lies behind the veil of “national security” and begin to act like responsible adults instead of childish bullies.

Originally posted 2010-11-28 02:00:13.

Mr President, now is the time to be a president.

There is a good article on CNN.com by Donna Brazile on what President Obama could (and should) do to get the economy back on track.

I think she’s got the right idea, but I think she really stops short of just outright saying that the problem isn’t necessarily Obama’s failed programs, it’s his failed leadership.

Now is not the time to sit on the fence Mr President; you’ve tried to build a consensus with congress (you failed to do that when your party had control of both houses, and you’ve continued to fail to do that now that your party doesn’t)… it’s time for you to lead — or to step aside and let someone else do so.

The problems this country has are solvable; but every day we wait to start moving down a path that is likely to put us on the road to get American’s working and to pay down the enormous debt that Republicans and Democrats alike have saddle the current (and future) generation(s) with we simply make the problem harder — and at some point there will not be a solution, the US will simply drift into the fray of third world countries never likely to regain it’s position as a real world leader again.

So, Mr President — be the president; make the hard choices; and move this country forward… it’s not the time to be a politician or a two term hopeful, it’s time to be a president.

 


4 ways Obama can take control to get America back on track by Donna Brazile on CNN.com

Originally posted 2011-08-17 02:00:42.

Angry Voters

Hey, I’m at the front of the line of people thinking it’s time for a change — and it’s time to throw out everyone we’ve elected and try someone and something new…

BUT

Someone needs to be the voice of reason here… just because we’re pissed (or as it was put)

…made as hell and not going to take it any longer…

That doesn’t mean we should be looking to angry leaders to solve our problems.

Yes, we should be looking for people who are fed up with those who have come before them; but leaders need a level head, they need to lead with reason not wrath.

Say yes to the growing anti-incumbent fervor that’s growing; but be very careful about aligning yourself with angry people who want power.

Originally posted 2010-05-29 02:00:31.