Fangate

I don’t know whether to classify this is sad, tragic, or funny…

Apparently Rick Scott refused to take the stage for seven minutes in a debate with Charlie Crist because Crist had placed an fan in his podium to help keep cool.

Scott stated that because the debate rules forbade electronic devices the fan was a violation; clearly (like so many other things), Rick Scott doesn’t know the difference between electrical and electronic devices.

If his intent to was illustrate to the world how stupid he is, he certainly achieved it.

I would never entertain the idea of voting for Scott (nor did I entertain such an idea in the past).  That’s not saying I’m thrilled about the candidate running against him… but I’ll certainly make sure to mark my ballot against Rick Scott in a few days when early voting opens.

Erin Go Bragh

m4s0n501

The Anglicisation of the Gaelic phrase used to express allegiance to Ireland; most often translated as “Ireland forever”.

Happy St Patrick’s Day!

Originally posted 2010-03-17 02:00:56.

Full Moon

The first full moon of 2010 — HOWL.

Originally posted 2010-01-30 10:00:54.

Comparison of Canadian and American health care systems

There are a number of comparisons between the Canadian and US health care systems; and like with any complex issue you can make the comparison show almost anything you want depending on the metrics chosen for the comparison and the facts included (or omitted).

Often the Canadian and American systems are compared since until the 1960s they were extremely similar, and Canadian and Americans share a large common history and to some extent culture.

This comparison on Wikipedia appears to be an honest attempt to compare and contrast the two systems, it includes a number of citations.  I recommend reading it, and considering what it has to say in light of the the current state health care in the US.

Comparison of Canadian and American health care systems

Originally posted 2010-03-16 13:03:11.

Ubuntu 11.10

I tested out an upgrade of Ubuntu 11.10 on a virtual machine and on a desktop machine… it seemed to go fairly well; but I can’t say that Unity really feels like something that was the result of human factor engineering.

I decided to go ahead and phase in the 11.10 upgrade to three of my five servers; and let me tell you that was a huge mistake.

First, I found that the upgrade didn’t properly detect the disk to update the grub configuration on (my RAID controller is the first device discovered, so it makes the motherboard SATA controllers come after that so my boot device is sdb rather than sda).

Then I found that FreeNX simply will not install on 11.10 — but I was able to fall back to the NoMachines.com “free” NX server.

Then I found that neither VNC or NX would work properly with Unity; simply switching to KDE fixed that.

What a nightmare.

What should have been a half hour upgrade turned into a day of wasted time… and for what?

This experience has definitely diminished my faith in the Ubuntu development community, and I find myself asking why should I continue to support a product that’s heading in a direction that I do not like, and obviously isn’t meshing well with the rest of the Open Source community.

What’s wrong with GNOME?  What’s wrong with KDE?  Why do we need lightdm and Unity as the defaults in a product that users depend on?  Particularly when Unity doesn’t seem to resolve any of the complaints I have about useability.

Personally I’d favor a desktop along the lines of Macbuntu for usability (it doesn’t have to look like a Mac, but at least pick a interface that looks coherent, and make it act coherent).

I think I might consider moving my servers back to Centos and returning to stability… to me it looks like Ubuntu is becoming the next Windows of the Linux world (and I have no need to be in line for that roller coaster).

Originally posted 2011-10-18 02:00:57.

Landscaping

Last year was spent mainly cleaning up the yard, this year I’m focused on trying to make some forward progress with landscaping.  It’s been a busy Spring planting season.

I started with a flower bed in the front of the house; 100 tulip bulbs (only about 70 came up).  I’d hoped to plant canna lilies to come up after the tulips, but finding bulbs here has proven to a challenge (the only Summer bulb that any of the nurseries around here carry are caladiums, and never considered I’d have to order something so common).

Then two Azaleas when in on the side of the house by the pourch.

Two areas (one in back and one in front) of the breezeway were done in concrete pavers.

Two cedar trees were moved out from under an oak tree in the back yard to the side of the back yard where they could grow.

A red Camila was put in the front by the mail box; a Japanese (Tulip) Magnolia was put in the front; a Gardenia was put in the side yard near the front of the garage.  Four Privet Ligustrums were put in the side yard to break it up, hide the A/C unit, but not interfere with sunlight through the bedroom windows.

Nine blue berry bushes were put along the rear fence.

Four compost bins were put in the back corner of the yard.

Four fig bushes (Brown Turkey) were put along the side fence in the back (between two oak trees).

Two plum (Blue Dawson & Golden), two peach(Florida King & Elberta), and two pear (Pineapple & Bartlett) trees were put in the back between the oak and the cedar trees.  A persimmon (Fuyu),  an Asian pear apple, a lime (Persian), two lemon (Meyer’s & Pink Variegated), a pomegranate (Russian 26), and an orange (Calamondin) tree were put in front of those.

Eighteen tomato plants (Heritage & Better Boy), eighteen pepper plants (Sweet Banana & Cayenne), and nine cucumber plants were put in the back in front of the figs.  I’ll probably expand my garden next year, but these plants will help condition the soil and provide me with much tastier alternatives than the grocery store (I almost always get my produce from the farmer’s market anyway — this should be less expensive and a nice diversion).

Three Medjool date palms and two Sago palms were put in the front corner; and one banana tree was put in the end of the flower bed.

That’s probably it for this year… certainly the yard has been greatly transformed by the addition of all this vegetation, and the care that’s gone into the few healthy tree that were here.

I still have much more to do, but I can’t be sure we’ll have adequate rain this year — so I can only plant as much as I can comfortably water.

Originally posted 2010-04-11 02:00:13.

Bush v. Gore

At a law school Supreme Court conference that I attended last fall, there was a panel on “The Rehnquist Court.” No one mentioned Bush v. Gore, the most historic case of William Rehnquist’s time as chief justice, and during the Q. and A. no one asked about it. When I asked a prominent law professor about this strange omission, he told me he had been invited to participate in another Rehnquist retrospective, and was told in advance that Bush v. Gore would not be discussed.

The ruling that stopped the Florida recount and handed the presidency to George W. Bush is disappearing down the legal world’s version of the memory hole, the slot where, in George Orwell’s “1984,” government workers disposed of politically inconvenient records. The Supreme Court has not cited it once since it was decided, and when Justice Antonin Scalia, who loves to hold forth on court precedents, was asked about it at a forum earlier this year, he snapped, “Come on, get over it.”

There is a legal argument for pushing Bush v. Gore aside. The majority opinion announced that the ruling was “limited to the present circumstances” and could not be cited as precedent. But many legal scholars insisted at the time that this assertion was itself dictum — the part of a legal opinion that is nonbinding — and illegitimate, because under the doctrine of stare decisis, courts cannot make rulings whose reasoning applies only to a single case.

Bush v. Gore’s lasting significance is being fought over right now by the Ohio-based United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, whose judges disagree not only on what it stands for, but on whether it stands for anything at all. This debate, which has been quietly under way in the courts and academia since 2000, is important both because of what it says about the legitimacy of the courts and because of what Bush v. Gore could represent today. The majority reached its antidemocratic result by reading the equal protection clause in a very pro-democratic way. If Bush v. Gore’s equal protection analysis is integrated into constitutional law, it could make future elections considerably more fair.

The heart of Bush v. Gore’s analysis was its holding that the recount was unacceptable because the standards for vote counting varied from county to county. “Having once granted the right to vote on equal terms,” the court declared, “the state may not, by later arbitrary and disparate treatment, value one person’s vote over that of another.” If this equal protection principle is taken seriously, if it was not just a pretext to put a preferred candidate in the White House, it should mean that states cannot provide some voters better voting machines, shorter lines, or more lenient standards for when their provisional ballots get counted — precisely the system that exists across the country right now.

The first major judicial test of Bush v. Gore’s legacy came in California in 2003. The N.A.A.C.P., among others, argued that it violated equal protection to make nearly half the state’s voters use old punch-card machines, which, because of problems like dimpled chads, had a significantly higher error rate than more modern machines. A liberal three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit agreed. But that decision was quickly reconsidered en banc —that is, reheard by a larger group of judges on the same court — and reversed. The new panel dispensed with Bush v. Gore in three unilluminating sentences of analysis, clearly finding the whole subject distasteful.

The dispute in the Sixth Circuit is even sharper. Ohio voters are also challenging a disparity in voting machines, arguing that it violates what the plaintiffs’ lawyer, Daniel Tokaji, an Ohio State University law professor, calls Bush v. Gore’s “broad principle of equal dignity for each voter.” Two of the three judges who heard the case ruled that Ohio’s election system was unconstitutional. But the dissenting judge protested that “we should heed the Supreme Court’s own warning and limit the reach of Bush v. Gore to the peculiar and extraordinary facts of that case.”

The state of Ohio asked for a rehearing en banc, arguing that Bush v. Gore cannot be used as precedent, and the full Sixth Circuit granted the rehearing. It is likely that the panel decision applying Bush v. Gore to elections will, like the first California decision, soon be undone.

There are several problems with trying to airbrush Bush v. Gore from the law. It undermines the courts’ legitimacy when they depart sharply from the rules of precedent, and it gives support to those who have said that Bush v. Gore was not a legal decision but a raw assertion of power.

The courts should also stand by Bush v. Gore’s equal protection analysis for the simple reason that it was right (even if the remedy of stopping the recount was not). Elections that systematically make it less likely that some voters will get to cast a vote that is counted are a denial of equal protection of the law. The conservative justices may have been able to see this unfairness only when they looked at the problem from Mr. Bush’s perspective, but it is just as true when the N.A.A.C.P. and groups like it raise the objection.

There is a final reason Bush v. Gore should survive. In deciding cases, courts should be attentive not only to the Constitution and other laws, but to whether they are acting in ways that promote an overall sense of justice. The Supreme Court’s highly partisan resolution of the 2000 election was a severe blow to American democracy, and to the court’s own standing. The courts could start to undo the damage by deciding that, rather than disappearing down the memory hole, Bush v. Gore will stand for the principle that elections need to be as fair as we can possibly make them.

Has Bush v. Gore Become the Case That Must Not Be Named?
By Adam Cohen
Published: August 15, 2006; The New York Times

Originally posted 2010-09-09 02:00:33.

Panasonic HDC-SD10 High Definition Camcorder – Post Note

It was sunny (but cold) on Saturday, so I did get a chance to get outside and shot some bright daylight footage.

The color was excellent, the motion quality was very good.

With adequate lighting I don’t think you can touch the quality of this camcorder for twice the price.

Panasonic HDC-SD10 High Definition Camcorder

Originally posted 2010-01-10 02:00:24.

AT&T, the death of Netflix

On 2 May 2011 AT&T will implement usage surcharges for their high speed internet services.  DSL customer will have 150GB included with their package, and U-Verse customer will have 250 GB included with their package.

AT&T maintains that only 2% of their customers will be effected…

As I’ve said before, if only 2% of the customer are going to be effected, AT&T wouldn’t take any action —  it’s easy to see that AT&T is doing this because they feel this is a way to produce a larger revenue stream for a service they previously advertised and sold to be “unlimited” — so you can view this as nothing short of radically changing the service after the fact, and charging more for less (remember, AT&T just raised their rates).

The effect of this type of cap is that if you used your internet service to watch movies, you’d better be careful — you won’t even be able to watch one per day; you’ll have to worry about watching one HD movie every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

I personally have always felt AT&T was a horrible company, and certainly from my view point it reenforces that view every day with actions like this.

 

Monthly Activity 150 GB 250 GB
Send/receive one page emails 10,000 emails

-and-

10,000 emails

-and-

Download/upload a medium resolution photo to social media site like Facebook 3,000 photos

-and-

4,000 photos

-and-

MP3 Songs downloaded 2,000 songs

-and-

3,000 songs

-and-

Stream a one-minute YouTube video (standard quality) 5,000 views

-and-

5,000 views

-and-

Watch hour-long TV Shows (high quality) 100 shows

-and -

200 shows

-and -

Stream full length movies (Standard Definition: SD; High Definition: HD) 20 SD or 10 HD movies 25 SD or 13 HD movies

Usage examples are estimates based on typical file sizes and/or duration of file transfer or streaming event.

http://www.att.com/internet-usage

Originally posted 2011-03-31 02:00:25.

Autumnal Equinox 2014

September 23 2014 02:29 GMT