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GE Money Bank – Promos

I consider GE Money Bank to be a fairly low end credit card company, but they do often have attractive promotions to get you to sign up for a card… and they continue to offer promotions to get you used to using their cards.

Some of the promotions here of late — Sam’s Discover, $40 instantly off your $100 or more purchase; Wal-Mart Discover, $20 statement credit for a $100 or more purchase; eBay MasterCard 10% up to $25 back from your purchases in the first thirty days; and Chevron-Texaco VISA $10 gas credit for four transactions in the first thirty days (not clear if they need to be at a Chevron or Texaco or not).

Plus, what you start seeing around the end of your first thirty days are offers from GE Money Bank for a $10 statement credit for spending $100 or more at business other than the one the card was issued for — I just generally make my automobile insurance payment with the card, something I would do anyway — you might lose the 1% you would have gotten back on another card, but you get $10 plus whatever the GE Money Bank card bonus is for other charges!

From my experience you get two of the $10 off offers, one each of the months following your sign up — at least I have, and the only thing I charge on the cards is basically what I need to get the promo.

The downside is you’ll probably need to contact your credit card issuer and “remind” them about the promo; they’ll credit it pretty quickly after that (give them a statement period — but call after the statement the credit should have appeared on)… I won’t say the system always fails to apply the credit, but it has for me.  And there’s no reason to get testy with them, just be calm and tell them what happened (I save copies of the promos — both the initial electronic ones and the letters they send me just in case) and you might have to be sent to a supervisor — but you’ll get the credit with no problems as long as you fulfilled the terms of the promotion.

It’s easy cash — and you don’t have to use the cards after you have the money in your pocket; though watch out about accumulating too much credit for your asset level — if you’re not going to use the card, request them to lower your credit limit (or you can consider closing the account, but I would suggest you just lower the credit limit).

Originally posted 2010-12-05 02:00:33.

DHCP

DHCP, or Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, is an internet standard defined by RFC1541 and later by RFC2131(as well as a few other RFCs relevant to other physical mediums) as an extension to BOOTP.

DHCP is a fairly elegant method to give client computers configuration information to allow them access to an IP network.

Conceptually the protocol is straight forward:

  • A client machine boots and activates it’s network adapter
  • A client machine requests IP configuration information
  • A server provides IP configuration information with a time specific lease
  • A client consumes the IP configuration information and setups up it’s network adapter
  • A client attempts to renew it’s IP configuration information when the lease has half expired
  • A client releases it’s IP configuration information when done with it
  • A server release client specific configuration information either when it’s been released by the client or the lease has expired.

Most home and small businesses use DHCP and they use their router / gateway device as the DHCP server (most of these devices default to enabling their DHCP server).

Some gateways allow you a great deal of control over the DHCP server, they allow you to set MAC address to IP bindings, specify the DHCP records to be provided.  Some gateways only allow you to turn on or off the service.

An option to running the DHCP server in your router / gateway would be to run it on a machine that is always on (or at least is one when any machine that might need DHCP services might be on).

Microsoft provides a DHCP server as part of their server operating systems (Server 2003 and Server 2008), ISC provides a DHCP server that can be run on a variety of operating systems, and there are a few shareware and open source DHCP servers that might fit your needs.

There’s no question that DHCP is the way to manage IP configuration information in a small network, and most business and enterprises use DHCP as well.

Alternately if you don’t have a device that does DHCP and don’t want to or can’t use a software solution you can use the “Alternate Configuration” panel on a Windows PC to setup the IP address configuration information and if a DHCP server is ever present it will override the information you’ve entered on the PC.  This is very handy for laptops that need to be configured by DHCP when they’re out and about or at the office, but when you don’t have a DHCP server at home and need to connect to another machine.  This is different than statically setting the IP address on the machine, if you do that you have to change the configuration each time you need DHCP.

Originally posted 2009-01-11 12:39:33.

Summer Solstice 2018

June 21 2018 10:07 GMT