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I’m not sure I trust Canonical…

I received this email from Canonical (the company that supports Ubuntu) yesterday (I’ve neutered the anchor on the link)

From: landscape-team@canonical.com
Subject: You have been invited to the Landscape account canonica
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 2010 12:07:48 +0000 (GMT)

You’ve been invited to the following Landscape account:

Canonical – candidates (canonica).

Please click the following URL to accept the invitation:


Then a few hours later I received this email (I’ve removed hard breaks so that it reads a little easier as a blockquote)

From: Jamshed Kakar <landscape-manager@canonical.com>
Subject: Apology for mistaken ‘Canonical Landscape Invitation’ email
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 2010 20:03:23 +0000 (GMT)


A few hours ago one of our systems accidentally sent you an invitation for a trial account in Landscape.  The invitation was sent to you by mistake as a result of incorrect data in our contact database.

We’re working hard to ensure that this sort of thing won’t happen again.  Please accept our sincere apologies for this accident.

Jamshed Kakar
Landscape Project Manager

The only conclusion that I can draw is that information I used to apply for a job with Canonical a month ago or so was mishandled and made available for (mis)use by others in the company.  Given that this has happened (clearly my information has been mishandled) it raises a concern as to how much Canoncial can be trusted handling any potentially sensitive or personal information…

Consider credit card numbers provided to them for support; contact information for sales or employment… the list goes on.

My advice — don’t trust any company with personal information that can obviously not be trusted to properly handle and safe guard that information.

I have requested that Canonical immediately remove any and all of my personal information from all of their databases (I certainly wouldn’t feel comfortable being employed by or doing business with such a company), maybe you should do the same.

Originally posted 2010-03-24 01:30:17.


Einstein theorized that time wasn’t constant — that it was effected by both relativistic frames of motion (velocity) and gravity.

Now scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado, US have measured variances in  with unprecedented accuracy.

I seriously doubt we’re any closer to The Time Machine HG Wells envisioned and certainly the proof probably won’t meet with as much skepticism as On the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin.

Originally posted 2010-09-28 02:00:50.

Spring Forward – Fall Back

Today Daylight Savings Time ends in every state of the US except Hawaii — that’s the only US state (in it’s entirety) that does not observe Daylight Savings Time; the time zone, HAST (Hawaii-Aleutian Standard Time; UTC-10) — of course the Aleutian Islands (Alaska) were on HADT until just a bit ago…

If you’re thinking I’m wrong because you believe Arizona doesn’t observe Daylight Saving Time you’d be partially correct… but since the Navajo Nation does observe Daylight Savings Time, and it’s located within the boundaries of the state of Arizona, the state in it’s entirety wouldn’t meet the condition of my assertion.

Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, Guam, and American Samoa also do not observe Daylight Savings Time, but they aren’t states (they’re possessions) so they also fail to me the conditions of my assertion.

And fortunately for everyone the wacky system Indiana used for a very long time vanished in 2005 when the entire state began observing Daylight Saving Time.

Generally Benjamin Franklin is credited with the idea of Daylight Savings Time… but his plan technically called for the shifting of working hours, not the changing of the clocks — the actual concept of changing the clocks is generally attributed to William Willett (England) in 1907 — but the plan wasn’t adopted until World War I.

While the US observed daylight savings time during World War I, the law was quickly repealed after the end of the war (1919); it was re-established during World War II, used year round in 1973-1974 (Energy Crisis), and finally fixed by law in 1987 to insure consistency among states, then expanded in duration in 2005 (it’s not mandatory that a state observe Daylight Savings Time, only the start / end dates are set by Federal law if a state so chooses to observe Daylight Savings Time).

Personally, I think Daylight Savings Time, and Time Zones are an albatross that we simply do not need any longer; you’d have though with the redefining of measurements by the Metric System we’d have addressed the bizarre way in which humans measure the passage of time, and reference it by the calendar.

Originally posted 2010-11-07 02:00:06.

JustHost.com POP / IMAP / SMTP Settings

host: mail.<yourdomain>
host: <yourhost>.justhost.com
port: 110
port: 995, SSL

host: mail.<yourdomain>
host:<yourhost> .justhost.com
port: 143
port: 993, SSL

host: mail.<yourdomain> (requires authentication)
host: <yourhost>.justhost.com
port: 25
port: 2626
port: 465, SSL

url: https://<yourdomain>:2096
url: https://<yourhost>.justhost.com:2096


  • SSL: you will need to accept the self signed certificate; some mail readers do not allow you to retain self signed certificates, so you will need to do that each and every time a connection (or initial connection) is made.
  • SMTP: requires authentication; also you ISP may block port 25 (which is why port 2626 is also supported).
  • <yourhost> would be something like cl111 so for example cl111.justhost.com
  • <yourdomain> would be something like mydomain.com so for example mail.mydomain.com

Originally posted 2010-03-05 02:00:49.

Dick Cheney complains about lying in the White House

The Washington Post has an amusing video to a statement Dick Cheney made in reference to the White House lying with respect to the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act (oddly he never expressed a similar feeling about White House lying while he was in office).


December 10, 2013 7:52 PM EST — The former V.P. is offended of being lied to about Obamacare (The Washington Post)


Originally posted 2013-12-11 18:00:41.

You’ll find “it” at Fry’s…

One of well known slogans from Fry’s Electronics… but from what I’ve seen over the past 25 years all you’re really likely to find at Fry’s is pathetic customer service (maybe that’s the “it” they’re talking about).

Sure, Fry’s tends to have good prices on their lost leaders (their normal prices are just retail)… and if they put it in their ad you can get it from any one of a number of other retailers at the same price (or better) by exercising a competitor’s price match policies and not have to deal with the horrendously bad experience of walking through the doors of a Bay Area Fry’s (Fry’s in other parts of the country actually have reasonable customer service… though I’m still not sure I would want to reward a company that trusts it’s employees almost as little as it trusts it’s customers and locks up completely random selections of items in order to force you to get a “quote” and have to deal with  even more incompetent employees).

For me I’ve decided I just will not buy at Fry’s… and when more people reach the same conclusion that if you stop supporting businesses that don’t deserve customers businesses with have to care about consumers and won’t do what ever they feel they can get away with.

After all… I’ve had to sue Fry’s a number of times in small claims court (and won); and they’ve lost a number of much larger law suits.  Is that the kind of business you want to encourage?

Originally posted 2008-08-31 18:54:49.

Armistice Day

The eleventh minute of the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of year 1918 AD marked the official end of German involvement in World War I with their signing of the Armistice in a railway carriage in Compiègne Forest, Picardie, France (near the town of Compiègne).

Dedicated as Remembrance Day by King George V (England) in 1919 and proclaimed Armistice Day by President Woodrow Wilson (US).  Today is now known through much of the Western World (particularly in the Common Wealth) as Remembrance Day; though the US has celebrated is as Veterans Day since 1954.

Red poppies are often used as a symbol to remember the blood shed; white poppies are often (offensively) used as a symbol to be vigilant for peace.

We should always remember the past, and learn from our fore fathers so that we might leave the world a better place for those who follow.

Originally posted 2009-11-11 11:11:59.

Historical Tid-Bit

Fort Pickens, located on Santa Rosa Island, Florida was built after the War of 1812 along with Fort Barrancas, Fort McRee, and Navy Yard to fortify Pensacola Harbor.

On 8 January 1861 guards at Fort Barrancas repelled an attack by a group of local men (some historians consider these as the first shots fired in the American Civil War) causing Lt Adam J Slemmer to destroy 20,000 pounds of gun powerd at Fort McRee, spike the guns at Fort Barrancas, and evacuate his troops to Fort Pickens (which had not been occupied since the Mexican-American War) because he consider that to be a much more defensible location.  History proved Slemmer to have made a wise move, since Fort Pickens was the only fort in the South that the Union forces held throughout the war.

In 1960 Fort Pickens was designated a national historic site and opened to the public in 1976.

In 1960 Fort (San Carlos de) Barrancas was designated a national historic site and opened to the public in 1980.

I have some very old film shots of Fort Pickens that I will likely eventually digitize and post to my gallery; though this summer I’ll get some digital stills of both Fort Pickens and Fort Barrancas and the remnant foundations and views from Fort McRee (a nice hike, but nothing much is left).

All three forts (along with Fort Massachusetts, MS) are part of the Gulf Islands National Seashore which stretches along the coast of Mississippi, Alabama, and Northwest Florida.

Fort Pickens NPS, Wikipedia; all three forts NPS; Fort Barrancas Wikipedia; and Fort McRee Wikipedia.

Other notable forts along the coast in the Southeast:

Fort Pike Wikipeda and Fort Macomb Wikipedia are in Louisiana.

Fort Massachusetts NPS, Wikipedia (off the Mississippi coast) is closed this year for major renovations.

Fort Morgan Wikipedia and Fort Gaines Wikipedia are in Alabama.

Fort Jefferson (Dry Tortugas National Park) NPS, Wikipedia and Fort Marion/Castillo de San Marcos (St Augustine) NPS, Wikipedia are in Florida.

Fort Frederica NPS, Wikipedia and Fort Pulaski NPS, Wikipedia are in Georgia.

Fort Sumter NPS, Wikipedia is in South Carolina.

Originally posted 2010-03-31 02:00:02.

Grip of Death

The proverbial feces has hit the proverbial fan in iPhone 4 “antenna-gate”…

Personally I think it’s sad the way Apple CEO Steve Jobs treats his customer’s (and the world) with so little respect.

Jobs is now telling the world that all phones suffer from the same problems that plague the iPhone 4, and he’s showing numbers to prove it.  Now, Job’s hasn’t commissioned a large study performed by an independent testing firm; he’s not using numbers published by each phone’s manufacturer; he’s not basing his claims on customer complaints; he’s not performing tests of large statistically sound sample sets of handsets… he’s just (as usual) running off at the mouth and trying to tell his customers what they should be thinking and what they should be buying.

Well, I certainly don’t see any appreciable difference in my signal strength dependent on how I hold my HTC smart phone… in fact, I didn’t see any problem with the previous two HTC handsets I had either — so maybe Mr Jobs needs to consider the possibility that designing a phone based on aesthetics rather than performance might be the root of his problem; and that maybe some of his customers want more than just a fashion accessory or a “me-to” statement.  It’s funny that I really couldn’t find any Apple marketing material that was centric on signal performance of the iPhone 4 — of course, since Apple still only offers the iPhone on AT&T it might just be an assumption that anyone who buys an iPhone really doesn’t consider reception or network performance to be a real concern (remember, AT&T’s network has been plagued with over subscription, and their solution was to stop offering unlimited data plans).

The other absolutely ridiculous thing about Job’s is he can’t seem to get his story consistent.  I mean, is it a hardware design flaw correctable by a rubber phone bumper (which will increase the size of the iPhone), is it a software glitch that your programs will resolve (by what — removing the call to “if (grip-of-death) then drop-call” — or just changing the signal display so it’s less of a indication of reality than it is now), or is it just something that any and all smart phone users have to live with (why aren’t there lots of complaints from owners of other models, brands — and why didn’t previous iPhones suffer from this problem).

The really interesting thing is that “antenna-gate” has grown from a bit of grumbling by tech-savvy users online, to getting the notice of online tech magazines, to crossing over into mainline media, to now causing a stir by at least one elected official.

HTC, Samsung, and Research In Motion (RIM) have all categorically stated that the problems that the iPhone 4 are displaying are not an endemic problem with other smart phones in the market place.  And Consumer Reports stated that it couldn’t recommend consumers purchase the iPhone 4 (but their reports did indicate that a rubber bumper, or even a piece of tape placed over the “gap” between antenna sections would greatly resolve the issues).

And while Job’s might be trying to put any spin he can on this to make other smart phone vendors look bad — in the UK, Samsung is providing disgruntled iPhone 4 users with free Galaxy S Android based handsets (all they need to is post their displeasure with the iPhone, contact Samsung, and the next day they’ll have a Galaxy S handset).

My personal belief on this is that Apple is running scared.

They know that they’ve shipped over three million handsets that have a manufacturing defect; and that they realize that forcing individuals to accept a material different product than they purchased is going to end up backfiring.  I mean, let’s face it — iPhone 4 users purchases an iPhone 4, not an iPhone 4 with a rubber bumper around it (changing the size and aesthetics).

Apple’s based in Cupertino California — California is one of the states with a lemon law which clearly states that if the manufacturer is unable to fix the problem in three tries, they have to provide a full refund for the item.  And materially changing the size and appearance is probably not something they can choose to do… so I’m really surprised that the legal beagles aren’t initiating litigation against Apple for recovery of actual, consequential, and punitive damages.

But this isn’t a concern to me — since I’d never purchase a phone without a keyboard; so I’ll never have an iPhone — and I don’t think anyone who’s serious about a communications device would ever purchase one either.

Senator Schumer’s letter to Steve Jobs (at Apple):

July 15, 2010

Dear Mr. Jobs,

I write to express concern regarding the reception problem with the Apple iPhone 4. While I commend Apple’s innovative approach to mobile technology and appreciate its service to millions of iPhone users nationwide, I believe it is incumbent upon Apple to address this flaw in a transparent manner. According to Consumer Reports’ review, released Monday on its Web site, the iPhone 4’s signal-strength problem is a hardwire glitch triggered by gripping the device in a particular manner. This finding, according to Consumer Reports, “call[s] into question” Apple’s recent claim that the problem is “largely an optical illusion caused by faulty software.” Consumer Reports declined to recommend the iPhone 4 because of this hardware design flaw.

Given the discrepancy between Consumer Reports’ explanation of the reception problem and the explanation provided by Apple in its July 2 letter to customers, I am concerned that the nearly 2 million purchasers of the iPhone 4 may not have complete information about the quality of the product they have purchased. The burden for consumers caused by this glitch, combined with the confusion over its cause and how it will be fixed, has the potential to undermine the many benefits of this innovative device. To address this concern, I ask that Apple provide iPhone 4 customers with a clearly written explanation of the cause of the reception problem and make a public commitment to remedy it free-of-charge. The solutions offered to date by Apple for dealing with the so-called “death grip” malfunction–such as holding the device differently, or buying a cover for it–seem to be insufficient. These proposed solutions would unfairly place the burden on consumers for resolving a problem they were not aware of when they purchased their phones.

I also encourage Apple to keep its promise to provide free software updates so that bars displayed accurately reflect signal strength; I further urge Apple to issue a written explanation of the formula it uses to calculate bar strength, so that consumers can once again trust the product that they have invested in.

I look forward to Apple’s swift action on this matter, and once again laud Apple for its innovative efforts and service to millions of Americans.


Charles E. Schumer

Originally posted 2010-07-31 02:00:45.

Windows 7

It’s here…

Today is the official release of Microsoft® Windows 7.

Originally posted 2009-10-22 01:00:12.