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Google Mail IAF Creator

One of the big problems of using Outlook Express, Windows Mail, or Windows Live mail with Google Mail (or Google hosted Mail) is that the IMAP folder presentation for special folders isn’t what you probably want (or are accustom to).

It’s a straight forward fix to just save an IAF for the account and edit to correct the presentation of the special folders, but that might be a challenge for some, it’s error prone, and generally a pain in the butt.

Since I’ve been encouraging a fair number of clients, associates, and friends to consider using Google Mail or Google Hosted Email I decided to write a tool to create IAF files that were “correct”.

What I’ve implemented is a fairly simple PHP script that will take in your name (that’s what you want displayed), your [complete] email address, and your password — and I’ll prepare an IAF file that you can download, save, and then import into your Microsoft Windows mail reader (you should delete any identical account you might already have — and to be completely safe, export it to an IAF file so that you have it for recovery if necessary).

While you have no reason to trust me on this… I don’t keep your email address or your password (in fact they are deleted as soon as possible) — I’m not interested in SPAMming you or selling off your email — and I certainly could care less about most of the email I get… much less the email others get.

If you want the source code, I don’t have any issue with that — and I’ll consider posting an archive of the files (I use a library that’s freely available to do the IAF, it’s really just a PHP wrapper and an AJAX web page around that… but then again, it’s all one’s and zero’s if you want to get really technical.

IAF Creator

Originally posted 2010-10-22 02:00:26.

The pig is back!

The old Piggly Wiggly in Milton (at 6516 Caroline St, Milton, FL 3257) closed years ago, and that location was just renovated recently and opened as a discount grocery outlet; but recently The Grocery Store in East Milton (9447 Florida 87 South, Milton, FL 32583) re-branded as a Piggy Wiggly.

The pig is back!

Piggly Wiggly
9447 Florida 87 South
Milton, FL 32583

(850) 686-8861

http://www.pigglywiggly.com/

 


 

Piggly Wiggly Beginning

Where It Began…

Piggly Wiggly®, America’s first true self-service grocery store, was founded in Memphis, Tenn. in 1916 by Clarence Saunders. In grocery stores of that time, shoppers presented their orders to clerks who gathered the goods from the store shelves. Saunders, a flamboyant and innovative man, noticed that this method resulted in wasted time and expense, so he came up with an unheard-of solution that would revolutionize the entire grocery industry: he developed a way for shoppers to serve themselves.

Despite predictions that this novel idea would fail, Saunders’ first store opened September 6, 1916 at 79 Jefferson Street in Memphis. Operating under the unusual name Piggly Wiggly, it was unlike any other grocery store of that time. There were shopping baskets, open shelves and no clerks to shop for the customer – all unheard of!

Piggly Wiggly Corporation, established by Saunders when he opened the first store in Memphis, secured the self-service format and issued franchises to hundreds of grocery retailers for the operation of Piggly Wiggly stores.

The original Piggly Wiggly Corporation became owner of all Piggly Wiggly properties: the name, the patents, etc., and Saunders began issuing stock in the Corporation. The stock was successfully traded on the New York Stock Exchange for some time, but through a series of stock transactions in the early 1920s, Saunders lost control of Piggly Wiggly and had no further association with the company.

Piggly Wiggly Corporation continued to prosper as franchiser for the hundreds of independently owned grocery stores allowed to operate under the Piggly Wiggly name and during the next several decades, functioned successfully under various owners.

All in a Name

Saunders’ reason for choosing the intriguing name Piggly Wiggly ® remains a mystery; he was curiously reluctant to explain its origin. One story is that he saw from a train window several little pigs struggling to get under a fence, and the rhyming name occurred to him then. Someone once asked him why he had chosen such an unusual name for his organization, and Saunders’ reply was, “So people will ask that very question.” He wanted and found a name that would be talked about and remembered.

old logo

Piggly Wiggly® “Firsts”

Piggly Wiggly’s introduction of self-service grocery shopping truly revolutionized the grocery industry. In fact, many of the conveniences and services that American shoppers now enjoy were introduced first by Piggly Wiggly®.

Piggly Wiggly was the FIRST to…

  • provide checkout stands.
  • price mark every item in the store.
  • give shoppers more for their food dollar through high volume/low profit margin retailing.
  • feature a full line of nationally advertised brands.
  • use refrigerated cases to keep produce fresher longer.
  • put employees in uniforms for cleaner, more sanitary food handling.
  • design and use patented fixtures and equipment throughout the store.
  • franchise independent grocers to operate under the self-service method of food merchandising.

Clarence Saunders

What Happened to Saunders?

After Saunders’ disassociation with Piggly Wiggly®, he opened a chain of stores which operated under the name “Clarence Saunders, Sole Owner of My Name Stores,” and although it was successful, the Depression forced Saunders to close the chain. Then, in 1937, Saunders designed and constructed a prototype of an automated store, which he called the “Keedoozle” (for “Key Does All”).

Once again, Saunders had captured the country’s attention with his latest venture; although, mechanical failures eventually closed the store.
Until the time of his death in October, 1953, Saunders was developing plans for another automatic store system called the “Foodelectric.” But the store, which was to be located two blocks from the first Piggly Wiggly store, never opened.

Clarence Saunders never fulfilled his dream of opening a truly automated store. Sadly, his death came just as the full impact of his better idea for grocery merchandising was becoming apparent. Saunders’ creative genius was decades ahead of his time.

Piggly Wiggly New Logo

Piggly Wiggly® Today

Today there are more than 600 Piggly Wiggly stores serving communities in 17 states. All Piggly Wiggly stores are independently owned and operated, and are located primarily throughout the Southeast and as far north as Wisconsin.

Piggly Wiggly, LLC’s corporate headquarters are in Keene, N.H. It issues Piggly Wiggly franchises to qualified independent grocery retailers. The company also provides the retailers with services such as support, marketing programs and a line of promotional items.

Piggly Wiggly, LLC is an affiliate of C&S Wholesale Grocers, Inc., ranked as the 10th largest privately held company in the nation by Forbes magazine in 2010. For more than 90 years, C&S has provided first-class warehousing and distribution services to its customers. From more than 50 warehouse facilities throughout the United States, C&S serves some of the largest supermarket chains in the nation. Their corporate offices are located in Keene, N.H.

Straight talk about cellular service

I’ve been a Verizon Wireless customer for a very very long time, and except for a short flirtation with MetroPCS (or as it’s often called — GettoPCS) I’ve been reasonably loyal.

But that’s about to change.

This week my Google/LG Nexus 4 arrived as well did an AT&T SIM card (through Straight Talk available on-line or at Wal-Mart).

I have an old Verizon plan, unlimited for a reasonable price (roughly $82 with tax after my 20% discount through a previous employer); and I had a Google/Samsung Galaxy Nexus S2, so I enjoyed LTE (in areas where Verizon had LTE service).

With Straight Talk, I’ll get unlimited AT&T services (MVNOs don’t generally have access to LTE) for $45 per month plus tax; but wait, until 18-Feb-2013 Straight Talk is offering a $2.50 reduction on your monthly service if you sign up for auto-pay (if you currently have Straight Talk with auto-pay, cancel your auto-pay and immediate set it back up to take advantage of the discount). Note, the $2.50 discount does not apply to your initial service payment, that’s going to be $45.00 plus taxes even if you immediately sign up for auto-pay.

I activated the SIM (you don’t actually even need a phone to activate a SIM card, you use a “serial number” they provide with the SIM card to register everything, then just pop it in the phone) on Thursday morning (yesterday), didn’t want to do it Wednesday night after returning from Mardi Gras (even though the phone and the SIM were laying on the front porch — sleep was more important).

And voila, it works — and it works well.

Straight Talk actually offers service on all four major networks: Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile.

For AT&T or T-Mobile you simply need an unlocked GSM phone and the SIM for the network you would like service on (purchased through Straight Talk / Walmart). Or you can just purchase a handset with a SIM installed directly from Straight Talk / Walmart. Note, if you go with an unlocked GSM phone, there will be a couple settings you’ll have to change on the handset to have full function with the network; but those are well documented online.

For Verizon or Sprint you must purchase a handset from Straight Talk / Walmart that works on the network you choose. You can purchase a used Straight Talk handset on Craigslist or eBay, but remember that if it’s marked as stolen or lost, you might not be able to activate it.

And… the cost of the service is the same, regardless of what network you’re on, and the service is unlimited (keep in mind unlimited in cellular speak doesn’t mean what it does in the rest of the English language, if you use abusive amounts of service you’re likely to get throttled or terminated).

Now what’s the catch — well… you deal with Straight Talk customer service rather than the network’s customer service (let’s face it — they’re all horrible, and hopefully you’ll never need to deal with them at all); you don’t have access to partner or roaming, only the network you actually have service with (which really doesn’t matter generally unless you travel to fringe areas — and if that’s the case, stick with what works); you don’t have a contract (oh, wait, that’s not a catch); you own your handset outright (though Straight Talk does offer insurance on handsets they sell; or you can do what I do and pay for the service with a credit card that provides some level of cellular handset insurance coverage free).

And yeah I hear all of you — what about the iPhone… well, Straight Talk will sell you one (and Walmart has 0% financing so you can spread out the payments over a year), or if you’re going with AT&T or T-Mobile service you can just purchase a GSM handset from the Apple store or buy one used.

I’ve actually been considering switching for about a year; originally I was fixated on going with Verizon service since it was the only carrier I trusted, but times change. AT&T has been busy building out it’s network and increasing coverage, Verizon has been busy reinforcing the fact that they don’t care about their customers and re-tuning their towers to support LTE data services (and apparently forgetting that some people still want to make voice calls).

Now your mileage may vary, and the downside of choosing Verizon or Sprint is that you’re stuck with the selection of handsets offered by Straight Talk (which isn’t the latest and greatest — other than the iPhone 5); with AT&T or T-Mobile you can choose any handset (by just getting the SIM).

I don’t think this is the end of traditional wireless carriers, after all, Straight Talk depends on them for the actual service, but pre-paid unlimited plans like this truly seem to be the most economical way to have cellular service; and you don’t have to miss out on the latest and greatest equipment (with GSM service), all you have to do is front load the cost by buying the handset outright.

My guess is with more consumers buying handsets outright, the price of handsets will actually moderate closer to what they really cost, and not carry a surcharge to support the deep discounts the manufacturers give to cellular carriers to woo them to offer their handset.

http://straighttalk.com/